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There is no shortage of books looking at the history, problems, and prospects of the modern state of Israel. I try to keep an eye on developments and, like many, find it simply overwhelming. Narrowing a bibliography simply to religious books on this ...

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Gene Kleppinger

June 28, 2012  9:17am

Elizabeth, your references to the land acquisition in Jackson's era are very appropriate. But surely you do not mean that the treaties negotiated between the last kings of Israel and Judah, with Assyria, Medo-Persia and Babylon, represented transfers of property that should still be respected and reinterpreted. I thought that the main point was the idea that divine land distribution claims always trump what civil governments might do.

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Elizabeth Levesque

June 27, 2012  2:23pm

Dan: you are right on. Gene: Native Americans have "treaties" with US Government. Native Americans are considered "sovereign nations". Israel has no such arrangement with "Palestine" which is a fiction. "Palestine" is the name Rome gave its occupied territory (Israel) in 63 BC and by 135 AD every Jewish reference to its former territory was expunged. This history is easily accessible. It is not surprising to those of us who support Israel that Hamas/Hezbollah and all other terrorists are using the Roman occupied and colonizing as well as genocidal term "Palestine." However, Native Americans still use their own names, ceded territories for payments, (the Cherokees, Muscogees, CReeks and several other tribes were paid 2 million in Andrew Jackson's treaty arrangements for former lands and relocated to Oklahoma). So, if you enter into a "treaty" and get millions of dollars for your land you can't complain. You can't complain about what you sold. The "Trail of Tears" is another matter.

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Dan Bruce

June 27, 2012  9:40am

One of the things left out of this review (and perhaps out of the book) is the role of the Palestinians during WWII. The leader of the Palestinians spent the war in Berlin plotting the extermination of the Jews in Palestine with Heinrich Himmler as part of the Holocaust. After the U.N. partitioned Palestine between Jews and Arabs (the Arabs got 89% of Palestine) in 1947, the Arabs rejected the U.N.'s partition and attacked the Jews in Palestine in the war of 1948. After Israel won, more than 700,000 Jews were expelled or intimidated to leave Arab lands, most migrating to Israel. The Arabs have threatened the Jews in Israel ever since. Israel is usually portrayed as the agressor in modern books, but the truth is much more complicated. Most evangelicals have little accurate knowledge about how the modern nation of Israel came to be.--Dan Bruce, The Prophecy Society

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Gene Kleppinger

June 26, 2012  2:04pm

Do Christians who accept the idea that the land of Israel belongs to the current Jews also work toward restoring the lands of Native American tribes to their current descendants? The parallel seems very clear--the Native American tribes have recorded traditions that trace their territories back through their spiritual ancestry, just as some Christians and some Jews claim Biblical grounds for the Mosaic or Solomonic boundaries for Israel. Would it not make a great example to Mideast countries seen as Israel's enemies for America to find ways to recognize Native American territories that were seized through conquest rather than divine provision?

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