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President Barack Obama prevailed over GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney, Democrats maintained control of the Senate, and Republicans held onto the House of Representatives last night—elections that likely will maintain status quo for federal ...

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Displaying 1–34 of 34 comments

Michael champion

November 21, 2012  1:58am

My Christian conscience is guilt-free after voting for President Obama. The absolute hatred of President Obama by "devout Christians who have Jesus in their heart" is bad enough. But when you add the blatant violation of God's Commandment, "Thou shalt not bear false witness against thy neighbor" by those "devout Christians" who, out of ignorance and/or hatred, say the President is a "Muslim", a "Marxist", a "Communist", an "Athiest", "un-American", "un-Patriotic", a "Baby-Killer", a "Nazi", etc., it makes me think the lyrics have been changed to------"And, they'll know we are Christians by our Hate, by our Hate. Yes, they'll know we are Christians by our Hate." Well, if the President is "out to destroy America", then I guess I am, too. When it comes to Economic Policy, Taxes, Health Care, Social Security, Medicare/Medicaid, Welfare Programs, Immigration, Education, the Environment, Foreign Policy, and Gun Control, I am to the "Left" of Obama. That must make me the Anti-Christ!

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J Thomas

November 20, 2012  12:12am

Get ready for the new reality, Christians. The neoprogressive machine that directs the democrats (and a portion of the republicans) views you as an enemy, an obstacle that must be removed. You are not viewed as an equivalent member of society deserving of all of the rights afforded you under the constitution. You are now a second-class citizen. Prepare for the full force of the government to be directed at you, especially if you resist. The Holy Spirit, through the multi-housing ministry movement, is preparing us to go underground. Pray for the believers, that our persecution be delayed!

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Bryan Starrett

November 14, 2012  8:39pm

This Christian voted for President Obama, just as I did four years ago. I could say that I employ critical thinking and pragmatism when considering issues of religious ideology, politics, and government, but in truth I simply don't have enough hate in my heart to vote with the bitter religious right.

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Claire Guest

November 13, 2012  11:39pm

Kat McH, I cannot agree that this recent election gave a "clear signal" of any kind. For one thing, the margin of victory was small (less than 2% popular vote). When you add in the people who voted third party (and didn't vote at all) because they considered Romney to be too liberal, you get a different figure altogether. For another, voting irregularities have been reported in a number of states, including battleground states. I think it's significant that Romney won in states which require photo ID to vote. Last I heard, the plane carrying the military's ballots to the USA had crashed, and it didn't sound like they were going to have time to vote again. I'm not convinced that we've been given the true story, and I think the chances are good that we'll never get the true story.

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Kat McH

November 13, 2012  2:15am

The 2012 election was a pretty clear signal that the American populace does not want the religious rules of rightwing Christians imposed on the rest of the country. I'f you're opposed to marriage equality then don't marry someone of the same sex. But our Constitution trumps your bible as the law of the land, so kindly keep your religious rules, rituals and superstitions far away from our secular government.

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Claire Guest

November 13, 2012  1:22am

How can anyone say "The 'Moral Landscape' has NOT changed" with a straight face? The moral landscape has undergone severe changes over the last few decades. The most recent example is that of re-defining GOD's definition of marriage. When people profess to be Christians, the implication is that they agree with God's Word, including His moral standard. So how is it that a professed Christian can agree with this re-definition, which in all its implications further denies GOD's Word about same-sex sexual relationships? PilgrimP, why do you make such a hateful accusation as "Christian Taliban", when you know that no such thing exists? To lump this pejorative in with Reps and the Tea Party (whose main message is to call for fiscal responsibility) is beyond reprehensible. William Penn said, "Men must be governed by God or they will be ruled by tyrants." If things keep going as they've been going, the REAL Taliban may very well take over, then you'll know what REAL oppression is. GOD HELP US.

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Claire Guest

November 09, 2012  9:48pm

Niall, I actually agree with your statement here, at face value: "...the maniacal insistence on single ideological issues, like [same-sex] 'marriage'". It's only been recently that this "maniacal insistence" (which I agree is an accurate assessment) started. Before that, the commonly-accepted definition of marriage was that of men and women. You seem to get the cart before the horse, like so many people in this country - you put the economy ahead of (im)moral issues. BUT God's Word is clear that people ignore and reject His moral standards to their own ruin, because these things incur His judgment and CAUSE negative economic ramifications. He said, "Blessed is that nation whose God is the Lord." The inverse is equally true. You also unjustly play the "hate card", which is nothing but a cheap shot. Disagreement with unGodly immorality as championed by Obama and Dems in general is NOT hate, just disagreement. Those who love God will love what He loves and hate what He hates.

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Claire Guest

November 09, 2012  9:39pm

Jon, your bias against white people (which is racism) is very evident in your post. I see all ethnicities as equals and my standard of truth is God's Word, which is why Albert Mohler's comment - "Evangelical Christians must see the 2012 election as a catastrophe for crucial moral concerns" - did NOT strike me as being cultural in nature. YOU say that black people would not agree with him, but I know better. My church is at least half African-American, and they totally agree - BECAUSE their standard of truth is God's Word too. YOU seem to assume that I (and other conservatives, as well) care nothing for the poor, widows and orphans, prisoners, etc. HOWEVER, what you (purposely?) overlook is that NOWHERE in Scripture does God command a GOVERNMENT to do what He has called HIS PEOPLE, HIS CHURCH to do. Nowhere does GOD command us to look to anyone BUT Him for our daily needs. He also plainly said, "If a man will not work, neither shall he eat." This is a BALANCE which is overlooked.

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Jon Trott

November 09, 2012  3:23pm

Claire, I cited Albert Mohler's comment: "Evangelical Christians must see the 2012 election as a catastrophe for crucial moral concerns." Yes, it is a cultural comment by Mr. Mohler. Why? Because almost no black Christians would agree with him. Almost no Christians serving the inner city poor would go along with his definition of "moral concerns." And that's the point. He has a very short list of what he considers "crucial moral concerns." I for one -- and there are many more like me -- do not consider his list to be either complete or primary. How many verses mention abortion? How many verses mention homosexuality? And how many verses mention the poor, justice, the widow and orphan, the prisoner? Tribal Anglo-Saxon values are foisted on us as being THE "biblical values." That's because we don't listen to anyone else. We are content to think our interpretation of Scripture *IS* Scripture. And I for one am so eager to throw off the burden with which this white hermeneutic has burdened

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Niall Lynch

November 09, 2012  12:32pm

I think it should be obvious that at a time when the country as a whole is suffering economically, the maniacal insistence on single ideological issues, like gay marriage, that do nothing to help the majority of those in this country, simply will not resonate. God/guns/gays/abortion may work fine when we are prosperous and secure. That's the time when the luxury of hate is cheapest. But in a situation like we have today, evangelicals have to come up with solutions for what is ailing us now. But on the economy, evangelicals have nothing meaningful to say. Perhaps it's time evangelicals starting thinking holistically about society. instead of siloing themselves in pursuit of boutique issues that matter only to the faithful. The faithful who just lost at the polls. Just a thought.

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samuel Shropshire

November 09, 2012  6:22am

I heard one evangelical leader refer to Obama’s re-election as the beginning of a "Post Christian Era" in American history. But I say it could possibly be be our Pre-Christian Era as those who claim to be followers of Jesus begin to reconsider their ways--begging God for His forgiveness for not having demonstrated God's compassion for humankind by behaving as Jesus would behave towards sinners of all stripes and persuasions. ("In that while we were yet sinners" God demonstrated his love towards us [Romans 5:28]). This is no time to take pride in our self-righteousness. God hates the self-righteous, prideful. It's a time for those who claim to be "His people" to humble themselves and repent, Richard Land and Southern Baptists included (2 Chronicles 7:14). "(Jesus) also told this parable to some who trusted in themselves that they were righteous and regarded others with contempt: ‘Two men went up to the temple to pray, one a Pharisee and the other a tax-collector. The Pharisee, standing by himself, was praying thus, “God, I thank you that I am not like other people: thieves, rogues, adulterers, or even like this tax-collector. I fast twice a week; I give a tenth of all my income.” But the tax-collector, standing far off, would not even look up to heaven, but was beating his breast and saying, 'God, be merciful to me, a sinner!' I tell you, this man went down to his home justified rather than the other; for all who exalt themselves will be humbled, but all who humble themselves will be exalted."

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J Thomas

November 09, 2012  3:32am

The moral landscape has collapsed completely. It is in utter ruin. Christians paid no attention while the amoral pushed them out of the public square. For there to be a Christian influence in the nation, we need not only strong and thriving churches who are being led by the Holy Spirit and taking the gospel to every public place, but we need to have a place in culture as well. Hollywood is vehemently anti-Christian. Our popular music is decidedly anti-Christian. Our news media is ardently anti-Christian. Our culture is deconstructing Christian morals and replacing them with amoral government-driven secularism. The new landscape is amoral. The moral will be persecuted. Where we were once just "prudes" or "sticks in the mud" we are now enemies of the state.

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Claire Guest

November 09, 2012  2:54am

Jon, Albert Mohler's comment - "Evangelical Christians must see the 2012 election as a catastrophe for crucial moral concerns" - did not specify any cultural differences. YOU did that. He did not make any divisive statements - you did. What he DID reference by inferral is GOD's moral standard, period. If God's Word, including His moral standard, is NOT the standard of professed Christians, there is a disconnect there between what such people profess to believe, and what they actually say (and vote, etc). BY THE STANDARD OF GOD'S WORD, the departure of professed Christians from agreement with His Word IS a catastrophe. Several denominations have officially departed into apostasy already, and this movement is only continuing on and on and on. The fact that it is happening is NOT reason to condemn believers who do NOT depart from Godly morality. Christ Jesus prophesied this falling away, and the apostles echoed this. He said that FEW would take the narrow road which leads to Life.

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Claire Guest

November 09, 2012  2:54am

James Aist, it is very refreshing here to see a fellow believer acknowledge the immoral [and amoral] liberal movement which is advancing in this country. Yes, Christ Jesus told us that this world would get much worse before His next coming, that we are not to become alarmed (Matthew 25), and that “In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.” (John 16:33). No, we don’t like the moral degeneration in the world, but we do indeed know that none of it is a surprise to God, God is still sovereign and in control, and God will bring righteousness and justice to the world and create a dwelling place for His elect that is free from evildoers altogether (Revelation 22:14-15). Yes, our job is to remain faithful to His Word (Matthew 28:18-20) until the end, however and whenever that end comes for each of us. Yes, this is where we can find peace and joy in the midst of escalating spiritual darkness until that time. Well said, brother. I totally agree with you.

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Claire Guest

November 09, 2012  2:53am

P.S. to my post below, Jon: Watch this - virtually everything here is straight from Obama's own mouth. Note that whenever Obama mentions the Qu'ran, he calls it the "holy Qu'ran" (but he has made mocking comments about the Bible, he didn't call it the "holy Bible", and he mocked Christians in PA during the 2008 campaign with particularly heinous accusations). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCAffMSWSzY

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Claire Guest

November 09, 2012  2:35am

Jon, I continue to marvel at your ability to live in denial. Surely you cannot be completely ignorant of Obama's background, including his formative years, his experience in college, and his adult life, which have included extensive mentoring by Marxist mentors throughout his life. To simply acknowledge these FACTS is not "defamation" any more than it is defamation to acknowledge Romney's Mormon background. Christ Jesus said, "By their fruit you shall know them", and He never gave indication that it was a false judgment to acknowledge that fruit -- rather, just the opposite. You also falsely accuse me of hostility - I am not hostile to Obama at all; I pray for him regularly because I know God is not willing that ANY should perish, but that ALL should come to repentance. Your continual false judgments of me do not intimidate me. I will continue to speak the truth. Christ Jesus said, "If you continue in My Word, you shall know the truth, and the truth will make you free."

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James Aist

November 08, 2012  6:38pm

We born-again Christians need not panic or despair when we see the immoral liberal movement advancing. Jesus told us that this world would get much worse before His next coming, that we are not to become alarmed (Matthew 25), and that “In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.” (John 16:33). We don’t like the moral degeneration in the world, but we know that none of it is a surprise to God, that God is still sovereign and in control, and that God will bring righteousness and justice to the world and create a dwelling place for His elect that is free from evildoers altogether (Revelation 22:14-15). Our job is to remain faithful to His Word and to His instructions (Matthew 28:18-20) until the end, however and whenever that end comes for each of us. This is where we can find peace and joy in the midst of escalating spiritual darkness until that time. More at http://rethinkingtheology.com/2012/09/03/the-gay-agenda-what-in-the-world-i s-going-on/

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Jon Trott

November 08, 2012  4:00pm

Claire Guest, you are indulging in defamation here as well as falsely claiming an authority which belongs to God alone. You do not get to say who is Christian and who is not. Barack Obama has over and over again -- at length -- described his faith's development and his allegiance to Jesus Christ. You may personally doubt him, which is your right. But you do not have the ability to read someone else's mind or know their heart... especially when you are manifestly so hostile to the President that you have repeatedly posted outright false information about him and even his relatives. It is highly disturbing to see you continue doing this despite having it pointed out to you again and again. I do not question your own faith; I do, however, question your actions here as being manifestly sub-standard from a Scriptural point of view.

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Claire Guest

November 08, 2012  8:57am

Heather, I just can't understand why so many professed Christians are so supportive of Obama, who could not possibly make it plainer that He despises God's Word - he even blasphemed Scripture in declaring his support for same-sex "marriage". This makes no sense! I am fully aware that Mormons are not Bible-believing Christians. The kicker is, neither is Obama. He was indoctrinated in Marxism from childhood, chose Marxist mentors as he grew up, and chose a Marxist Black Liberation Theology church as a grown man. The viable choices this year were a Mormon and a Marxist. Even if you believe Obama is a Christian, consider the words of Christ Jesus in Revelation where He condemned lukewarm believers who did not stand strong in His Word (surely you know how grievously Obama has mocked and violated God's Word). Jesus said He prefers that people be hot or cold. BTW - Taxation is not GOD's way of helping the poor. And putting Government in GOD's place is idolatry. Neither of these is Biblical.

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Claire Guest

November 08, 2012  8:56am

Shary Habuber, go to the nearest Crisis Pregnancy Refuge Center - you'll find many Christians working hard at all the things you mentioned. Better yet, go there and volunteer your own time and efforts. Please. Christ Jesus said, "Inasmuch as you have done it to the least of these my brethren, you have done it unto ME." Who is more "the least of these" than the little babies who are the youngest, most helpless, most innocent among us? Why do we dare kill them just because they are inconvenient? Remember the words of Christ Jesus.

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Heather Harrison

November 07, 2012  11:07pm

I just don't understand why Christians are so supportive of Romney. Mormonism and Christianity do not even share the same beliefs. They are diametrically opposed to each other. It makes no sense!

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Welby Warner

November 07, 2012  11:04pm

How about having an actually Biblical definition of what is meant by "Religious Liberty". As far as I have read and heard, the meaning now most often used seems to be quite worldly, having little to do with the liberty of individuals to worship God and follow the teachings of the Lord Jesus Christ to preach the gospel and carry the message of salvation to everyone. The meaning used seems to be the liberty of organizations to restrict and define what employees of those organizations can do in certain areas, resulting in an abridgement of the rights of those employees under the terms of the amendments to the constitution. Instead of pointing people to the life-changing principles expounded by the founder of christianity, evangelicals are urging support of political leaders of a particular party. Now that that party has lost, and the party leaders are saying such horrible things about the party's standard-bearer, how do evangelicals feel about their blind support for what would fail?

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Kelley Smith

November 07, 2012  6:29pm

This is very very strange. The day following an historic election, those on this site are still acting as if this is first Bush term. The usual suspects are quoted, the same talking points. Where is the revelation? Where is the fresh thinking? Why are Christians of all people, looking at this nation from the outside? Where are those who are cunning as snakes? Why would GOD bless a cult member as President? Let me stop here. I have too many questions and can find no answers.

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Jon Trott

November 07, 2012  6:13pm

I was asked about my numbers re voter turn-out among Evangelicals, broken down by race. “Seventy-eight percent of white evangelical Christians went for Romney, up from 74 percent for 2008 Republican presidential nominee John McCain” (Washington Post). That translates to about 1 of 4 for Obama. Hispanic Evangelicals were not counted this year by pollsters post-election that I can find, though Pew Research said pre-election they polled 50% to 39% for President Obama (my 70% number was true for Hispanic voters overall, but not perhaps for Evangelical Hispanics if Pew's prediction held). Black Evangelicals? African-American turnout was in the mid ninetieth percentile for Barack Obama’s re-election; that overwhelming turnout included most Black Evangelicals because it included virtually every black voter.

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Deana Holmes

November 07, 2012  5:49pm

Just looking at the people you chose to quote on this article, I can see a huge problem: Every.Single.One.Of.Them. is a white male. Moreover, they are, to a man, men of great privilege within the US Evangelical Protestant movement, with the exception of Timothy Dolan, who is a prince of the Catholic Church Where are the women? Where are the people of color? What about the immigrants? All missing. I don't hardly expect CT to ask those of us who are beyond the pale of Evangelical Protestantism for our opinions (e.g., GLBT persons, divorced people, single people and the rest of us notorious sinners in your eyes). But when you go only to the white guys, well yeah, this is the result. Your problem is staring you right in the face, CT. I hope you're brave enough to see it.

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Grady Walton

November 07, 2012  4:04pm

Okay, Mr. Trott, why, as you say, did 1 outof 4 evangelicals, 10 out of 10 African American Christians, and 7 out of 10 Hispanic Christians vote for President Obama? I really want to know. By the way, the problem with the "render unto Caesar" argument is that America is a repulic where Caesar is us (metaphorically). We choose Caeser therefore we are answerable to God for our votes. Nevertheless, I wonder if the Lord might be doing something through President Obama's administration. Dare we entertain the idea that God might be at work in this? (Or we might just be going the way of ancient Rome.) Perhaps we are making this out to be more than it is. Maybe people are just afraid because of the bad economy and they want a president who they believe will make sure the government safety net is there for the most vulnerable in our society.

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KIMBALL BROWN

November 07, 2012  3:15pm

I don't believe we can abdicate our responsibility as citizens to bring our biblically informed moral viewpoint to the political discourse. To avoid trying to "impose" our moral views on others is to abdicate the political process entirely - we have, after all, "imposed" on our fellow citizens the idea that murder, rape, theft, slavery, etc. are morally wrong. Bringing our moral viewpoint to the ballot box is part of the political process. We don't always get our way on every issue, but we voice our opinion and try to convince others of its validity. Having said that, I agree that our time and effort would also be well spent in genuine help and ministry to those who are struggling with situations as described by Shary. While we should try to accomplish some things through the political process, we must never forget that each of us is called upon to love, care for, and witness to one another as an illustration of God's love for all.

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Norris Agnew

November 07, 2012  2:56pm

I have visited this site previously (before the election) and the vitriol was at an all-time high. Now, whether due to the absence of those inclined to spew vitriol, or to an increased sense of what the Christian approach should be to a fallen world system, it appears the consensus within our ranks is changing for the better. Folks, it has never been about the person who sits in the White House. He is simply a "Caesar" of sorts who heads this nation's government system, and just as Jesus said we should render to him what belongs to him. Trumping him is the King of Kings, and we take our marching orders from Him. One of His commands is to "Love our neighbor as we love ourselves." This involves dispensing with the "us vs. them" mentality that plagues so many in the church. We absolutely cannot reach out to the people in this fallen world if we continue to act as if we're so much better than they are. As it is often said, "But for the Grace of God go [we]."

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William David Troughton

November 07, 2012  2:20pm

Not only did God form Adam and Eve, he allowed then to choose to not obey Him and to sin, to default from responsibilities, though that inevitably brought consequences in their train. Perhaps we should be more godly in that respect, even if we live and advocate alternative life-styles. The light will shine when we do, when we do it together, and it can be warm and welcoming rather than coercive and repelling. But identification with highly individualistic philosphies and economic theories, rather than cooperative ones, is in a way following the wrong choices of Adam and Eve. It is actually contrary to the Gospel. Identifying with those who are seeking political power through misrepresentation and lies brings Christ's Name into disrepute.That is the horror of what has been happening among white Christians in the USA, and many around the world are distressed by it. It should not happen. Learn from other ways. It has been well said that, "I have seen the enemy and he is partly right!"

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Jon Trott

November 07, 2012  1:53pm

The SBC's Albert Mohler says "Evangelical Christians must see the 2012 election as a catastrophe for crucial moral concerns." NO. We must not do any such thing. That's just the point. When Mr. Mohler makes such absolutist statements and dares presume to speak for all Evangelicals, he leaves out not only the 1 out of 4 Evangelicals who voted for President Obama but also the virtually 10 out of 10 African American Christians and 7 out of 10 Hispanic Christians who voted for Barack Obama. The underlying assumption of Mr. Mohler's statement is undeniably... naive. It is the same dangerous naivety that haunts white Evangelicalism every time such conversations over social policy and the nature of justice take place. It is terribly divisive and not terribly biblical, frankly. For instance, the Bible on homosexuality. I agree with it. But it does not speak how I should deal with voting on my gay neighbor's right to choose his / her own relational beliefs and partner. Two different issues.

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Jim Gustafson

November 07, 2012  1:51pm

Why should we exert ourselves to "convince Americans to share our moral convictions about marriage, sex, the sanctity of life, and a range of moral issues"? No one is saved from eternal judgement by having the SBC "approved" view on abortion or gay marraige. What we should do is exert ourselves to bear witness to Jesus Christ. I pray that the election outcome will at last break down the false idol so many white American evangelicals have made of conservative politics. We worship the Lamb, not the Elephant!

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Mark Matthias

November 07, 2012  1:02pm

The so called moral majority couldn't accomplish their goals by way of the great commission, so they gave politics a try -- and failed their also. Why do you suppose that is? It appears that evangelicals actually believe we lived in a "moral" society before this "new morality" developed. That misguided belief is a major part of the problem. The tenets of morality go far far beyond a handful if sins. I am convinced that God wants self-satisfied people to see themselves as they really are. He wants people to recognize the spiritual bankruptcy that besets us all while we remain in this fallen state. God is not proud of us if we have fewer sins than our neighbors; He is proud of sinless perfection -- He is proud of His Son. The only way He can be proud of us is if we are humble, and in possession of Agape love. "Everyone who hates his brother is a murderer; and you know that no murderer has eternal abiding in him." (1 John 3:15). Think of this country's history -- objectively.

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Shary Habuber

November 07, 2012  12:58pm

If Christians had used the time they spent trying to convince people to vote against abortion to mentor a pregnant woman who couldn't figure out how she could make it if she had a baby. If Christians took the money they put into the Republican's pockets to help a pregnant woman find a safe place to live and supported her while she had her baby and found her way into a meaningful life. Then abortions would drop because Christians cared about people not just being right. Christians think it is great to give to causes that agree with their ideas but think it is wrong to help an individual in need because they may become depended on help. Don't they realize they are helping those who hurt others, the abused, disadvantaged, and poor, and that is good.

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Sabrina Messenger

November 07, 2012  12:22pm

Our hope and trust should not be in any human politician but in our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ. It's time for Christians to get back to that basic and stop with all the politicizing. As it say in Psalm 146:3-10 "Do not put your trust in princes, in human beings, who cannot save. 4 When their spirit departs, they return to the ground; on that very day their plans come to nothing. 5 Blessed are those whose help is the God of Jacob, whose hope is in the Lord their God. 6 He is the Maker of heaven and earth, the sea, and everything in them— he remains faithful forever. 7 He upholds the cause of the oppressed and gives food to the hungry. The Lord sets prisoners free, 8 the Lord gives sight to the blind, the Lord lifts up those who are bowed down, the Lord loves the righteous. 9 The Lord watches over the foreigner and sustains the fatherless and the widow, but he frustrates the ways of the wicked. 10 The Lord reigns forever, your God, O Zion, for all generations.

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