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Monday is for Missiology: Cynicism Doesn't Reach a Lost World

How skywriting evangelism at Disney World challenged me in how I think about evangelism.
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Monday is for Missiology: Cynicism Doesn't Reach a Lost World


Walt Disney World specializes in catching your attention—it's a paradise for people with ADD like me. There's something interesting everywhere you look. But the day I visited, there was one thing every person in the resort was certain ...

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Evelyn Sims

January 29, 2014  11:28pm

I can't help thinking of Paul encouraging their audacity in using 'all means to save some', though hardly imagining a plane, let alone one skywriting! In Australia we had Arthur Stace, totally illiterate and brought into the Kingdom from a life of poverty and alchoholism. He was challenged by the Lord to write the single word 'Eternity' in beautiful copperplate lettering on the streets of Sydney, having argued with the Lord that he couldn't even write his own name. In the darkness of early morning, so as not to be seen, he used a waxy chalk that didn't wash away too quickly and it became a well known symbol around Sydney to the point of being used in our fireworks at the millenium celebrations. Many around the world have testified to the challenge of that single word triggering their search for salvation. Hokey? I think not. He longed to see people come to Jesus . The story has been filmed as the Eternity Man by unbelievers intrigued by him, but interviews are from Christians.

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Bruce In Iloilo

January 29, 2014  8:25pm

The first step towards being listened to is to be trusted, is ethos. This is why introductions are so important. It builds up a belief in the listener that the speaker is credible. And this is why marginalization is so dangerous. If you are marginalized than no one takes you seriously -- no one listens. You are a minority, a fringe. Writing in the sky yes begins conversations but at a minimum it decreases marginalization. It is akin to gay pride marches. We're here. We're Christian. Get to know us. It may be cheesy and hokey but it is visible. No Christian closet here. With visibility comes credibility and conversion only comes after credibility, after visibility. Before society listens to you, they first must acknowledge your existence.

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Stefan Stackhouse

January 29, 2014  10:15am

Just because it is some guy in an airplane blowing smoke, can we be REALLY SURE that this was not actually and also the hand of God writing a message in the sky? This would not be the first time that the hand of God has written a large, widely visible message. (See Dan. 5) Just because God uses people does not mean that it is entirely their work and not His work.

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Michael Awbrey

January 27, 2014  5:17pm

With that many people seeing such a thing and talking about it, there was a great deal of opportunity for Christians on the ground to ask some questions of those around them and those passing by who were talking about it. Since the topic has been brought up already by the sky-writing, a simple, "So what do you think about that? Can I tell you what I think?" opportunity was there. I like you tend to roll my eyes at such things, but maybe I should use them for catalysts for those face-to-face discussions.

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Konstantine Michailidis

January 27, 2014  5:08pm

Tim Williams there is a story about the 'creepy' man handing out conservative gospel tracts in Sydney all his life who never saw fruit. It turned out that a few of the mega-church pastors at an international conference one year began to share how it was some guy on a Sydney street who gave them a tract and that started it all. I remember the 'creeps' on a street opposite the psychic centre I used to visit in London who quoted Bible verses and talked about the blood of Jesus. That was so creepy then. Hell is what is creepy to me now.

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HOPE International ministry executive and authors Peter Greer and Chris Horst discuss how organizations drift from their original mission in this episode of The Exchange.

Peter Greer is the President and CEO of HOPE International, a Christian faith-based, nonprofit focused on alleviating physical and spiritual poverty through microenterprise development. Chris Horst is the organization's development director. Together they wrote Mission Drift: The Unspoken Crisis Facing Leaders, Charities, and Churches.

Cast: Ed Stetzer

Tags: Peter Greer, Chris Horst, Mission Drift, Christianity, Leadership and Aid Agency

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