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Georgia's "Other Christian" vote

Does that mean "black church"?

Even in Georgia, the pollsters aren't asking Democrats if they're evangelical or born again (64% of Republican voters today said yes). But that doesn't mean there aren't some interesting religion numbers in the exit polls.


Obama
Clinton
Protestant (28%)
49
50
Catholic (8%)
55
45
Mormon (1%)
-
-
Other Christian (40%)
77
22
Jewish (3%)
-
-
Muslim (1%)
-
-
Something else (9%)
71
26
None (11%)
67
30

What's up with 40 percent of Georgia's Democrats identifying themselves as "Other Christian," compared to only 28 percent Protestant? (The state's 8 percent Catholic is consistent with the state's population.)

The Republicans have fewer "Other Christians," which makes me think it's largely a synonym for "black Protestants." (Note: They also have fewer Jews, "something elses," and "nones." And no Muslims. I've dropped these from the table below, but you can access the original here.)


Huckabee
McCain
Romney
Protestant (56%)
35
29
34
Catholic (10%)
20
32
39
Other Christian (24%)
48
27
20

Here are the evangelical numbers from Georgia:

Do you describe yourself as born-again or evangelical?
Huckabee
McCain
Romney
Yes (64%)
43
25
29
All other responses (36%)
17
37
36

Update: Our guest blogger Mollie Hemingway jokes: "Maybe Georgia has a huge Eastern Orthodox population." Hey, it is Georgia!

Posted:February 5, 2008 at 6:50PM
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Georgia's "Other Christian" vote