Jump directly to the content

North Korea Protests South Korean Christmas Trees

The border between North and South Korea has a new source of light this holiday season: three Christmas trees. The steel trees – adorned with lights and topped with crosses – stand on South Korea's Aegibong Peak, less than two miles from North Korea, as well as two other border observatories.

A long-standing project by local Christians since 1954, the Aegibong Christmas tree had not been lit since 2004 when both countries agreed to end propaganda activities near the border. The tree was considered a type of propaganda.

However, after an exchange of artillery fire at South Korea's Yeonpyeong Island that killed two soldiers in 2010, the South Korean government allowed the tree to be reinstated, despite heated protests from North Korea.

Related Topics:Asia
Posted:December 12, 2011 at 3:02PM
Gleanings aggregates what others are reporting. Learn more.
Recent Posts
Mark Driscoll Steps Down While Mars Hill Investigates Charges
(UPDATED) Driscoll offers 8-step solution to followers: 'Current climate is not healthy for me or for this church.'
Behind Ferguson: How Black and White Christians Think Differently About Race
Findings from significant study of religion and race in America inform debate over reactions to Michael Brown's death.
Eli Lilly’s Church Claims JP Morgan Chase Mismanaged Millions
Pastor-supporting philanthropist’s 'religious home' alleges it lost $13 million from bank’s big fees and bad investments.
Ebola Keeps Mercy Ships, African Evangelical Leaders Away from West Africa
'This type of contagious situation is unprecedented' in past two decades, says medical ministry.
Christianity Today
North Korea Protests South Korean Christmas Trees