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Jerusalem Monastery Suffers Graffiti in Latest "Price-Tag" Attack

(Updated) Vandalism at Church of the Dormition is latest in series of attacks supporting unauthorized settlements in the West Bank.

Update (June 3, 2013): Jerusalem's churches continue to fall victim to "price-tag" attacks. The latest case involves the well-known Church of the Dormition, built where some Christians believe the Virgin Mary died.

The Associated Press reports that "the words 'price tag' were found scrawled on the church's exterior" along with other, anti-Christian slurs.

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In the latest case of vandalism against a Christian building in Israel, police suspect Jewish extremists of spray painting the words "price tag", along with other offensive phrases, on the Monastery of St. Francis, located near Mount Zion in Jerusalem.

Israeli president Shimon Peres condemned the incident, saying that price-tag attacks are "contrary to the Jewish religion and cause great harm to Israel. Holy sites must not be harmed."

Price-tag attacks are part of a campaign that has been ongoing for years. The most recent attacks have come in response to police evacuations of illegal Jewish encampments in the West Bank. Israeli settlers say they will exact a "price tag" for their government's attempts to remove them from the territory.

CT has reported on previous price-tag attacks in Israel, including a September attack at Latrun Monastery that drew condemnation from top Israeli leaders.

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Related Topics:Israel
Posted:October 3, 2012 at 12:58PM
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Jerusalem Monastery Suffers Graffiti in Latest "Price-Tag" Attack