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Ed Cash Leaves the Gathering, Citing ‘Troubling Allegations’

Departure comes after the cult-like group’s founder, Wayne Jolley, was accused of spiritual and sexual abuse.
Ed Cash Leaves the Gathering, Citing ‘Troubling Allegations’ Rick Diamond / Getty Images
Ed Cash, 45th Annual Dove Awards Pre-Show

Christian songwriter and producer Ed Cash, best known as co-writer of the worship hit “How Great is Our God,” has cut ties with controversial pastor Wayne Jolley.

For the past decade, Cash was a key member of the Gathering International, a small congregation that meets in Jolley’s home. He’s led worship for the group, donated funds to Jolley’s ministry, and acted as one of Jolley’s chief lieutenants.

Cash and his brother, Scott, announced Wednesday, December 30, that they were leaving the Gathering after Jolley was accused of spiritual and sexual abuse. CT reported on concerns about Jolley’s conduct, theology, and finances earlier this month.

“We find all the allegations against Wayne Jolley to be very troubling and are grieved by the pain others have endured,” they wrote. “We're praying for the Lord's total healing and restoration for everyone involved.”

Scott Cash was also a leader at the Gathering. He preached at the group’s Saturday night meeting on November 21 in Jolley’s absence.

After CT’s report on Jolley was published, all of Jolley’s sermon videos were removed from the Gathering’s website. That site was also completely revised and now offers little information except on how to donate funds. The videos of the Gathering’s meetings, including an example of Jolley’s extended altar call asking for donations, have since been posted on YouTube.

Jolley followers call him a prophet and their spiritual father. They answer his sermons with “Yes, sir” and shower him with gifts and tithes in exchange for his blessing. They also submit the details of their lives—where to work, where to live, and who to associate with—for his approval. Those who criticize him—and the pastors and leaders of most other churches—are accused of being possessed by a demon known as Jezebel.

A growing number of Jolley’s former followers say they turned to Jolley for pastoral care in a time of need, believing he was a man of God with a worldwide ministry. In return, they claim, he took their money and tried to ruin their families. They also claim that Jolley’s ministry has covered up serious accusations of past physical and sexual abuse.

Jolley did not respond to a request for comment to the statement from the Cashes. The Cash brothers did not respond to a request for follow up comments.

In their letter, the Cashes said that they did not “knowingly support anything that does not honor the Lord.”

More details about Jolley’s ministry have been reported by CT and by The Atlantic.

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The full text from Ed and Scott Cash’s letter about leaving the Gathering:

Dear Friends,

We want you to know that we have left the Gathering. For several months we have been praying, seeking wisdom, and meeting with multiple well-respected Christian leaders about this decision.

We find all the allegations against Wayne Jolley to be very troubling and are grieved by the pain others have endured. We're praying for the Lord's total healing and restoration for everyone involved.

We hope our lives and character make it unmistakably clear that we would never knowingly support anything that does not honor the Lord.

Thank you so much to everyone who has prayed for us throughout this difficult time. We look forward to what God has planned for the future and are overwhelmed by His incredible mercy, peace, and truth.

Ed Cash and Scott Cash

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Related Topics:Church; Cults
Posted:December 31, 2015 at 11:41AM
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Ed Cash Leaves the Gathering, Citing ‘Troubling Allegations’