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The Viking invasions destroyed the glory of Celtic monasticism.
For a culture so reputedly bloodthirsty and 'barbarian,' the Celts were surpringsly winsome.
A Tradition for Neo-Pagan Times
Behind the fanciful legends of the fifth-century British missionary stands a man worthy of embellishment.
How Patrick may have convinced the Celts to turn from ritual killings to the one who died for all.
Celtic Christianity is not as theologically unique as many have supposed.
Irish monks and nuns are famous for their spiritual heroics.
Though named for a gentle bird, the ascetic Columba wielded enormous influence with chieftans and kings—even after he died.
Legendary Brigit brought joy and the burning presence of God.
The legendary exploits of four early Celtic leaders.
One of today's popular hymns began as a medieval Irish prayer.
What happened when Roman and Celtic Christianity squared off at the Synod of Whitby?
The most famous Celtic prayer shows why the Celts are known for exalting both creation and the Creator.
Much that is heralded as Celtic Christianity today is neither Celtic nor Christian.
They were a long and steady line of scholar saints who by their missionary zeal brought life to the people of God in Britain.
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March 20, 687: Cuthbert, bishop of Lindisfarne and a vocal supporter of Celtic practices over Roman ones, dies. Shortly thereafter the Lindisfarne Gospels monks created created in his honor (see issue 60: How the Irish Were Saved).

March 20, 1747: Severely ill with tuberculosis, Presbyterian missionary David Brainerd ends his work among the Native Americans of Delaware (see issue 77: Jonathan Edwards).

March 20, 1852: Abolitionist Harriet Beecher Stowe, daughter of famous Congregational minister Lyman ...

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