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The Viking invasions destroyed the glory of Celtic monasticism.
For a culture so reputedly bloodthirsty and 'barbarian,' the Celts were surpringsly winsome.
A Tradition for Neo-Pagan Times
ST. PATRICK'S DAY
Behind the fanciful legends of the fifth-century British missionary stands a man worthy of embellishment.
How Patrick may have convinced the Celts to turn from ritual killings to the one who died for all.
Celtic Christianity is not as theologically unique as many have supposed.
Irish monks and nuns are famous for their spiritual heroics.
Though named for a gentle bird, the ascetic Columba wielded enormous influence with chieftans and kings—even after he died.
Legendary Brigit brought joy and the burning presence of God.
The legendary exploits of four early Celtic leaders.
One of today's popular hymns began as a medieval Irish prayer.
What happened when Roman and Celtic Christianity squared off at the Synod of Whitby?
The most famous Celtic prayer shows why the Celts are known for exalting both creation and the Creator.
Much that is heralded as Celtic Christianity today is neither Celtic nor Christian.
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October 19, 1512: Martin Luther receives his Doctor of Theology degree from the University of Wittenberg (see issue 34: Luther's Early Years).

October 19, 1609: Dutch theologian Jacob Arminius, founder of an anti-Calvinist Reformed theology, dies at age 49 in Leiden, Netherlands (see issue 12: John Calvin).

October 19, 1720: Quaker minister John Woolman is born in Roncocas, New Jersey. He was known for his concerns to live a simple life exemplifying "the right use of things," and to end war, slavery, ...

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