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A spiritual hunger grew in reaction to the coldness and formalism of the Protestant state churches. Drawing from diverse roots, Pietism emerged as a quest to apply Reformation doctrine to personal life.
The Pietists' emphasis on the new birth and biblical authority had startling implications as to how one treated orphans, the lower classes and one's opponents. Orthodoxy was not enough. A changed life was required.
As Shakespeare wrote, "Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them." John Calvin was certainly not born great.
Our hearts are restless until they find their peace in you.
To Carthage then I came Burning burning burning burning…
From the 1961 edition of Edward B. Pusey's translation of The Confessions of St. Augustine. By permission of Everyman's Library and J.M. Dent & Sons, London.
Read for yourself the chief accounts upon which the millennium celebration is based; while these much-loved chronicles admittedly contain a good bit of legend, they are still the best history we have.
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March 22, 337: Constantine, the first Christian emperor of Rome, dies at age 47. As emperor, he issued an edict officially tolerating Christianity, though he did little to stave off paganism. He also summoned the Council of Nicea to settle the Arian dispute over the nature of Christ (see issue 57: The Conversion of Rome).

March 22, 1638: Religious dissident Anne Hutchinson is expelled from Massachusetts Bay Colony. Questioned about her teachings on grace, she insisted she had received divine revelations. ...

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