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A spiritual hunger grew in reaction to the coldness and formalism of the Protestant state churches. Drawing from diverse roots, Pietism emerged as a quest to apply Reformation doctrine to personal life.
The Pietists' emphasis on the new birth and biblical authority had startling implications as to how one treated orphans, the lower classes and one's opponents. Orthodoxy was not enough. A changed life was required.
As Shakespeare wrote, "Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them." John Calvin was certainly not born great.
Our hearts are restless until they find their peace in you.
To Carthage then I came Burning burning burning burning…
From the 1961 edition of Edward B. Pusey's translation of The Confessions of St. Augustine. By permission of Everyman's Library and J.M. Dent & Sons, London.
Read for yourself the chief accounts upon which the millennium celebration is based; while these much-loved chronicles admittedly contain a good bit of legend, they are still the best history we have.
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August 18, 1688: John Bunyan, author of Pilgrim's Progress preaches his last sermon, in London (see issue 11: John Bunyan).

August 18, 1732: In an emotional farewell service, Moravian Christians at Herrnhut sing 100 hymns and commission Leonard Dober and David Nitschmann as missionaries to slaves in the West Indies. Herrnhut, a community of only 600 members sent more than 70 missionaries between 1732 and 1742 (see issue 1: Nicolaus Zinzendorf).

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