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Read for yourself the chief accounts upon which the millennium celebration is based; while these much-loved chronicles admittedly contain a good bit of legend, they are still the best history we have.
Russia and the surrounding Slavic countries were at one time considered among the "most Christian" of nations. So where was the church during the revolution that made the USSR atheistic?
Why, all of a sudden, would an officially atheistic confederation of republics like the USSR choose to celebrate, in full pomp and grandeur, a thousand years of Christianity on its soil?
Can a king-ordered mass baptism of his nation's citizens really bring about their genuine conversion to Christ? What are we to make of Christ's command to "make disciples of all nations"?
It's being much-mentioned and much-lauded during all the millennial celebrations, but what, really, is this "Christian" faith that's so unfamiliar to most Western Protestants? Here's an introduction.
Though practically unknown to most Westerners, the history of Orthodox spirituality among the Eastern Slavs of Ukraine and Russia is a deep treasure chest of spiritual exploration and discovery.
The Soviet government reports that religion is definitely on the decline in the USSR. And given the persistent harassment of the state, one might expect that—but trustworthy sources say it isn't so.
The pagan prince of Kievan Rus' embraced a new faith, leading to the Christianization of the Ukrainian, Russian, and Byelorussian peoples.
Long-standing differences between Western and Eastern Christians finally caused a definitive break, and Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox still remain separate.
Orthodox writers on the deep mysteries of the Christian faith.
Little-known or fascinating facts about Eastern Orthodoxy
For centuries Christians East and West lived as strangers to one another. Then Catholics violated the Orthodox.
Why two attempts at reunion were rejected by the Orthodox people.
Why the Orthodox killed one another over icons.
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May 25, 735: Bede ("The Venerable"), father of English history, dies. In addition to his Ecclesiastical History of the English People (731), biographies of abbots, and Scripture commentaries, he wrote our primary source for the story of how Celtic and Roman Christianity clashed at the Synod of Whitby in 664 (see issue 60: How the Irish Were Saved and issue 72: How We Got Our History).

May 25, 1535: After holding Munster under siege for over a year, the army of the city's Roman Catholic ...

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