Today in Christian History

February 28

February 28, 1551: German Reformer Martin Bucer dies in England at age 60. One of the first Protestant ministers to take the radical step of marrying, he attempted to mediate between Martin Luther and Swiss reformer Ulrich Zwingli, but Luther would have none of it. "It is better for you to have your enemies than to set up a fictitious fellowship," Luther said (see issue 39: Luther's Later Years).

February 28, 1807: Robert Morrison sails from Britain to become the first Protestant missionary to China. By the time he died 27 years later, he had baptized only 10 Chinese, but his pioneering work (including a six-volume dictionary and a translation of the Bible) helped missionaries who came after him (see issue 52: Hudson Taylor).

February 28, 1944: Nazi soldiers arrest Dutch Christian Corrie ten Boom and her family for harboring Jews. The Jews hiding in her house escaped. Corrie was the only member of her family who survived internment in concentration camps.

February 28, 1638: The castle of Hara, on the Japanese island of Amakusa, held by 30,000 Christian troops under Masada Shiro, is captured. The defenders set fire to the castle, and all perished in the flames or by the sword. From then until 1873 (235 years later), Christianity was banned in Japan under penalty of death.

Read These Next

Free Newsletters
More Newsletters

May 2, 373: Church father Athanasius, "the father of Orthodoxy," dies. He attended the Council of Nicea, and after becoming bishop of Alexandria, he fought Arianism and won. He was also the first to list the New Testament canonical books as we know them toDay (see issue 51: Heresy in the Early Church).

May 2, 1507: Reformer Martin Luther is consecrated a priest, a role in which he would serve for 13 years before being excommunicated (see issue 34: Luther's Early Years).

May 2, 1559: John Knox, having ...

More from May 2