The Spotlight Syndrome

Those raised in a ministry home and who are now in ministry themselves have a unique perspective on the relationship of church life and family life. Kyle Idleman is a teaching pastor at Southeast Christian Church in Louisville, Kentucky. He and his wife, DesiRae, have three daughters, Mackenzie, Morgan, and Macy, and a son, Kael. Kyle's father, Ken Idleman, has been a both a college president and a minister. Ken now ministers at Crossroads Christian Church in Newburgh, Indiana. We thought you'd benefit from Kyle's perspective …

I've often thought I should be in some sort of support group for those who grew up in a ministry home. I'm Kyle and I'm a PK. Of course, there wouldn't be any real need for introductions because everyone would not only know who I am, they would also know from the sermon illustration that I used to wear Yoda "underoos."

People have long forgotten the compelling point my dad was making, but they forever retain the image of me in my Yoda pajamas. (I'm still looking for a way to work into one of my messages that my dad sleeps in his whitey tighties and black dress socks.)

In this support group, we also would bemoan the discrimination we faced. Always being held to a higher standard. Called on to pray at every youth meeting. Pressured to wear Christian t-shirts (This blood's for you! Yes, I wore that one). Oh, the expectations. For as long as I can remember, I've been asked, "Are you hoping to be a preacher when you grow up?" Actually, I'm still asked that from time to time.

But the real challenge for ministry kids is feeling that your entire life is being played out on stage for all to see. Sometimes referred to as "life ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview
To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.
Already a Leadership Journal subscriber?
or for full digital access.
Spring 2008: New Ways Teams Lead  | Posted
Read These Next
See Our Latest