Eugene Peterson laments in For the Beauty of the Church: Casting a Vision for the Arts (Baker Books, 2010) that he has been "trying for fifty years now to be a pastor in a culture that doesn't know the difference between a vocation and a job." It was a bunch of artists that clued him in on the difference.

Definitions are in order. According to Peterson, a job is "an assignment to do work that can be quantified and evaluated." Most jobs come with job descriptions, so it "is pretty easy to decide whether a job has been completed or not…whether a job is done well or badly." This, Peterson argues, is the primary way Americans think of the pastor (and, presumably, that pastors think of themselves). Ministry is "a job that I get paid for, a job that is assigned to me by a denomination, a job that I am expected to do to the satisfaction of my congregation."

A vocation is not like a job in these respects. The word vocation comes from the Latin word vocare, "to call." Although the term today can refer to any career or occupation (according to Webster), the word (vocatio, I imagine) was coined to describe the priestly calling to service in the church. So vocation=calling. This is how Peterson is using the word, anyway. And the struggle for pastors today, he continues, is to "keep the immediacy and authority of God's call in my ears when an entire culture, both secular and ecclesial, is giving me a job description."

During his seminary education in New York City, Peterson worked with a group of artists. They were dancers and poets and sculptors, and they all worked blue-collar jobs as taxi drivers, waiters, and salesmen—whatever they had to do to pay the rent and put food on the table. Soon enough Peterson realized that "none of them ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview
To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.
Already a Leadership Journal subscriber?
or for full digital access.
Calling  |  Career  |  Faithfulness  |  Obedience  |  Purpose  |  Work
Read These Next
See Our Latest

Follow Us

Sign up today for our Weekly newsletter: Leadership Journal. Each weekly issue contains support and tips from the editors of Leadership to help you in your ministry.