A growing number of evangelical Christians believe that some type of suicide is a "moral right" at the end of life, in certain extreme situations without hope of recovery. This according to recent numbers published by Pew. Christianity Today comments:

Belief in suicide as a moral option for those who are suffering has grown modestly in the general public since 1990, rising to 62 percent from 55 percent. Since the percentage of American adults who say suicide is never morally right has stayed roughly the same, most of that growth comes from people who answered "I don't know" last time now taking a stand, according to the study.

Opinion lines divided sharply based on respondents' frequency of church attendance, CT mentions:

Personal views reflect the number of worship services the respondent attends. Among those who attend services weekly or more, 14 percent report that suicide is morally acceptable, compared to 25 percent of those who attend services monthly or annually and 37 percent of those who seldom or never attend. By contrast, 50 percent of weekly worship service attendees believe there is never a moral right to suicide, compared with 19 percent who attend worship services monthly or annually, and 13 percent of those who seldom attend services.
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