See what's coming soon! Coming in October »

Jump directly to the content
magcover

Already a subscriber?

Home > Issues > 2013 > Winter > Call Me Maybe
Article Preview. Log in or subscribe now.

Senior pastors are disappearing. So are "associate" and "assistant pastors." Scan church bulletins or church websites and you'll see that a crop of "Lead Elders" and "Community Servants" have sprouted in their place. Not all of the new titles are so modest. You're also apt to spot "Lead Visionaries" or even "Cultural Architects."

If these new titles are any indication, people are rethinking the pastoral role. We figured it was time to join the fun. So we asked our readers what other titles might be apt. Suggestions ranged from the serious to the silly, and we've printed a few that caught our eye. We hope these novel monikers help you think about church leadership in fresh ways, and make you laugh a little, too.

Sheep Dog

Jesus is the shepherd, but he uses pastors to keep his sheep in line. "Sheep Dogs" may be a little mangy, but they have an important role.—Ginger

Linguist

The pastor is the one to teach the congregation the biblical language that most no longer possess. Not "Christianese," the words, metaphors, and concepts from the Scripture that describe our life in Christ.—David Swanson

Meaning Monger

Pastors frame the truth for people. Their words communicate and create meaning. In a culture that's big on frivolous entertainment and short on wisdom, creating meaning is what we need church leaders to do.—Jenni Ho-Huan

Bride groomer

All brides are beautiful, as the old expression goes. But they need all the primping they can get to look their best for the big day. The bride of Christ definitely needs a makeover. And God is using pastors to make her beautiful.—Matt Farlow

Cardiologist

Pastors are heart doctors. They're used by God to discern the condition of our hearts, diagnose disease, and apply the medicine of God's Word.—Terry Monson

Feeding Utensil

It might not be very flattering to describe a pastor as an eating implement, but feeding people the Word of God is at the heart of the pastoral calling. Forks and spoons make sure the food reaches mouths to nourish bodies.—Nathan Caldwell

Body Builder

Pastors are always working to build up the body. Not a body of muscles, but a body of believers. Through teaching, loving, and encouraging people, pastors strive to create a robust people of God, strong enough to lift each other up.—Alfred Czerwinski

Imagineer

To borrow from Disney, the pastor helps the church imagine what our lives in Christ look like. We can't assume people know (or can even imagine) what it means to be a new creation. They need "Imagineers" to help them envision the Christian life.—David Swanson

Firefighter

A pastor spends a lot of time quelling conflict—in other words, putting out fires. Like a good firefighter, church leaders rush to rescue people, even when it's dangerous to do so.—Harlan Rounds

Zookeeper

For ...

log in

To view the rest of this article, you must be a subscriber to LeadershipJournal.net. Activate your online account for complete access.

From Issue:Callings, Winter 2013 | Posted: January 16, 2013

Also in this Issue: Winter 2013

Anxiety Attack!

Anxiety Attack!Subscriber Access Only

What's a pastor do when he can't find the peace he's preached for years?
The New Tent-Makers

The New Tent-MakersSubscriber Access Only

Two young pastors are finding fresh ways to combine pastoral ministry and entrepreneurial ventures.
The 2012 Leadership Book Awards

The 2012 Leadership Book AwardsSubscriber Access Only

We highly recommend these titles as you strive to develop your leadership gifts.
Radical Calling

Radical CallingSubscriber Access Only

David Platt on being a pastor and a prophet, at the same time.

Subscribe to read more

Subscribe Today!

  • Monthly issues on web and iPad
  • Web exclusives and archives on Leadership Journal.net
  • Quarterly print issues

Print subscriber? Activate your online account for complete access.

Join the Conversation

Average User Rating: Not rated

No comments

Use your Leadership Journal login to easily comment and rate this article.
Not part of the community? Subscribe, or on public pages, register for a free account.
Reader's Pick
Changing the Scorecard

Changing the ScorecardSubscriber Access Only

Affirming everyone's vocation begins by changing the way we define ministry success.
Sister Sites
How to Teach the BibleBuilding Church Leaders

How to Teach the Bible