Religious States Donate More To Charity Than Secular States

Southern donors give roughly 5.2 percent income to charity; Northeast donors, only 4 percent.

Are Christians across the United States really tithing 10 percent of their income?

A new report suggests they may not be. According to The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Americans in Utah, Mississippi, Alabama, Tennessee, and South Carolina gave the highest percentages of their discretionary income to charity. Of these, only Utah averaged more than 10 percent.

The correlation between the religious preferences of Americans in those states – high density of Mormons in Utah and Protestant Christians in the Bible Belt South – is notable. The report concludes that donors in the most generous region, the South, "give roughly 5.2 percent of their discretionary income to charity—both to religious and to secular groups—compared with donors in the Northeast, who give 4.0 percent."

However, the data also indicate that "the generosity ranking changes when religion is taken out of the picture. People in the Northeast give the most, providing 1.4 percent of their discretionary income to secular charities, ...

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