Africa

Witchcraft Accusations Prompt Large-Scale Response by African Theologians

Christian leaders aim to 'turn the tide on the modern epidemic.'

Christian leaders in Africa are answering God's call to care for the "least of these" in an unusual way: by protecting widows and orphans from surging accusations of witchcraft.

Approximately 50 international pastors and scholars–the majority from seven African nations–convened in Nairobi, Kenya, last month to address the growing problem. According to the Carl F. Henry Center for Theological Understanding at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School (TEDS), which sponsored the conference, "This historic gathering marks the first large-scale, international and interdenominational effort within the church and within the framework of Christian theology to address the growing presence of witch accusations and violence."

Elderly women and orphans are often blamed for death, infertility, and financial problems. Although some secular nonprofits have tried to stem the recent increase in accusations, the Nairobi conference examined causes (one contributing factor: Nollywood Christian movies) as well as ...

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