Middle East

Has Biblical Archaeology's 'Gold Rush' Found King David's Palace?

(UPDATED) Ruins at Khirbet Qeiyafa are largest-known buildings in ancient Judah.

Update (July 29): Baptist Press notes several discoveries related to King Solomon at the excavation of Tel Gezer.

-----

A "gold rush mentality" has seized biblical archaeologists near the Elah Valley, a Philistine-Israeli border region that has been shedding new light on David and Solomon.

Now Israeli archaeologists have discovered the remains of two of the largest buildings known to have existed in the ancient kingdom of Judah. But were the buildings actually palaces of King David?

According to the Israel Antiquities Authorities (IAA), which led the excavation along with professors from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the archaeologists have identified one of the buildings as David's palace and the other as one of his royal storerooms. More importantly, they say the newly discovered buildings now are the best evidence of the existence of Judah in the 10th century B.C.

"The palace and storerooms are evidence of state sponsored construction and an administrative ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview
To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.
Already a CT subscriber?
or your full digital access.
July/August
Subscribe to CT and get one year free.

Read These Next

hide this
Access The Archives

In the Archives

This article is available to CT subscribers only. To continue reading, please subscribe. You'll get immediate access to this article and the entire Christianity Today archives.

Subscribe

Already a subscriber?
or to continue reading.