Ur Video: Dever & Wallis on Justice and the Gospel (Part 3)
If the gospel is not verbally proclaimed are we doing gospel work?

Is feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, healing the sick, and welcoming the stranger "gospel ministry"? In part 3 of the conversation about justice and the gospel, Mark Dever and Jim Wallis disagree about what can and cannot be legitimately called a gospel ministry. What do you think? If the gospel is not verbally proclaimed are we doing gospel work?

Pick up the Summer issue of Leadership Journal to read more from Dever, Wallis, and others on the intersection of justice and evangelism.

August 16, 2010

Displaying 1–8 of 8 comments

Doug

January 05, 2012  11:21pm

"Social justice says the government should make EVERYTHING equal by taking from those who have and giving to those who have not (taxation for the purpose of redistribution). Jesus never told us to reach into other people's pockets to give generously, he told us to personally store up our treasures in heaven." Actually "social justice" does not mean the government does it, it can equally mean that we as follower of Jesus should be living into a more fundamentally equal distribution of what God has entrusted to us. As for the notion that Jesus did not tell us to take from others, but to personally store our treasure in heaven, he did tell at least one guy to sell ALL he had and give to the . . . wait for it . . . poor.

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hjhutch

September 15, 2010  8:35am

While we are certainly, as Christians, called to love justice (Micah 6:8), nowhere in the Bible is the term Social Justice used. The term JUSTICE means that the same rules apply to all of God's children. When they don't, Christians should be the first to call for correction. Dever and Wallis largely agree on JUSTICE issues. SOCIAL JUSTICE is entirely different. Social justice says the government should make EVERYTHING equal by taking from those who have and giving to those who have not (taxation for the purpose of redistribution). Jesus never told us to reach into other people's pockets to give generously, he told us to personally store up our treasures in heaven.

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pete

August 24, 2010  3:27pm

I loved this dialog. There was a hearty agreement in my opinion and MUCH less disagreement than the blog might have wanted to have to attract interest. They agree that the Gospel includes personal salvation first and foremost, but social action is an integral part of the it. Loved to hear Wallis' real approach to abortion and gay marriage, without the chance ot editing what he really said! My appreciation for him has grown!!

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Chapp

August 23, 2010  11:11am

Wallis accusing Olasky for lying that he has taken money from Soros is now out in the light. Sure puts Wallis' credibility at least in question... http://blog.christianitytoday.com/ctpolitics/2010/08/wallis_admits_t.html

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Tim

August 20, 2010  12:34am

Wallis is sounding very evangelical and conservative here, guarding his words and stories and stories and stories carefully for this audience. In other settings, he is so different. It's sort of cunning. Many will be taken in by it. It's the nature of deception for wolves to put on sheep's clothing and use the same words the sheep know. I'm not biting the Wallis hook. There are many significant changes the household of faith needs to make to radically increase their involvement in serving the poor, but Wallis won't talk about those issues. He is more interested in believers keeping their old ways but merely add joining a political movement to tax believers into helping the poor, systemically controlled by a secular government. I think he'll succeed, but not for long.

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Erin

August 18, 2010  11:40am

May I attempt an analogy? If someone were asked to define "Erin," they probably wouldn't list my heart, brain, liver, kidney, etc. They would talk about relationship things and personality, my job and hobbies.Yet, my heart, brain, liver, kidney, etc., are integral to my being. Without them, I am either severely sick or dead. Talking about them doesn't "ignore" who "Erin" is; it seeks to ensure that Erin is healthy. Erin isn't healthy (let alone alive) when those things are missing. The Church isn't healthy (alive?) when social justice is missing. The Gospel isn't the whole Good News if we're only offering an infirm version of it.

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Rob Dunbar

August 16, 2010  10:06am

I do think Wallis is right that Christianity must not fit into categories of left and right. I'm glad that both Wallis and Dever drew the same line between the Gospel and the implications of the Gospel. Interesting to note that Wallis and Brian MacLaren both came from the Plymouth Brethren...at least, I think MacLaren is on record that he grew up in a PB church....

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Chapp

August 16, 2010  8:52am

to much from jim wallis... I don't think this interview got at the heart of the question from skye. poverty is unpopular on the right? that seems ridiculous... I don't think I've seen any boycotts or demonstrations from the right over the issue of poverty.

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