Jump directly to the content

Fighting Injustice through Art


Jun 29 2009
Iranian writers and filmmakers use media to address life and death in Iran.

Two recent films have played unexpected roles in raising awareness of political and religious practices in Iran that trap many women in cycles of oppression and violence.

Time magazine TV critic James Poniewozik recently blogged about Persepolis, a 2007 animated film based on a series of graphic novels by Marjane Satrapi about her childhood during the Iranian Revolution. Poniewozik noted that Satrapi provided a powerful representation of life in Iran at a significant moment for women's rights.

Then, this past weekend, The Stoning of Soraya M. debuted on 27 screens in the United States, earning $117,000. Based on a book by Iranian-French journalist Freidoune Sahebjam, the film tells the story of an Iranian woman stoned to death after being falsely accused of infidelity soon after the 1979 Iranian Revolution. Writer-director Cyrus Nowrasteh and actress Shohreh Aghdashloo are both Iranian.

Soraya M. is a story of injustice arising from religious and political systems in need of change, and has drawn comparisons to the story of Neda Agha-Soltan, the 26-year-old woman whose death in a Tehran demonstration over Iran's disputed elections was captured in a video shared worldwide.

"Before Neda, There Was Soraya M.," writes Politics Daily's Carl M. Cannon, who places the movie's story in a timeline of women in the media who have become the faces of Iranian oppression. He writes,

If you see this brilliant film, be prepared to be disturbed. You will also emerge with a newfound admiration for Shohreh Aghdashloo, the accomplished Iranian-American actress who plays Zahra, the aunt of Soraya, and the heroine of this film, and also for all the independent-minded women of Iran.

Jennifer S. Bryson, director of the Witherspoon Institute's Islam and Civil Society Project, also praises Aghdashloo's performance, but reminds viewers that Soraya M. does not represent all Muslims or Islamic political systems:

[D]irector Cyrus Nowrasteh's telling of this story portrays the lived-practice, not just an abstract concept, of Islam with nuance. This film is not a cheap shot at Islam or Muslims. Rather, in The Stoning of Soraya M. the faults of those who manipulate religion for selfish gain say more about individual human folly and the brokenness of the political system in that location than about Islam or religion.

Actor James Caviezel, best known for his lead role in Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ, plays journalist Sahebjam in Soraya M. He told Christianity Today Movies that watching Soraya M. should give viewers' an emotional 'trial run' to test their compassion. He told Beliefnet's Dena Ross something similar in a recent interview:

To add a comment you need to be a registered user or Christianity Today subscriber.

orSubscribeor
More from Her.menutics
The Pastor’s Wife Effect

The Pastor’s Wife Effect

Pastors' wives don’t need reverence. They need friendship.
How Love Leads Us to Worry

How Love Leads Us to Worry

When we love someone or something, we assume they’re ours to worry about.
What Does It Mean to Be Black-ish?

What Does It Mean to Be Black-ish?

How “exceptional” African Americans still bolster our stereotypes.
Have We Told You How Pretty You Look Today?

Have We Told You How Pretty You Look Today?

How our instinct to praise each others’ looks might fuel an image-obsessed culture.
Include results from Christianity Today
Browse Archives:

So Hot Right Now

Christine Caine, Liberty University to Launch ‘Lean In’-Type Program for Christian Women

Propel calls on the church to equip and validate working women.

What We're Reading

CT eBooks and Bible Studies

Christianity Today
Fighting Injustice through Art