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India: It's Complicated

By sticking to her ashram, Elizabeth Gilbert misses out - and so do her readers.

Eat Pray Love Book Club Discussion: Part 2

If a young, wealthy woman from India had traveled to the United States because she believed she'd find spiritual enlightenment, stayed for the entire four months of her trip at a retreat center run by a somewhat-controlling new religious movement that had branched off from Christianity, and then returned home to write a book about it, would you believe that she had a good understanding of either Christianity or the United States?

If all you knew about India was what you learned about the country from the book Eat Pray Love, you'd be forgiven for thinking that thinking that the country of India is a sort of spiritual spa where, if you're rich enough, you get enlightenment the way you might get a facial or a massage.

You might be shocked to learn that it's the world's largest democracy, roughly equivalent to the continent of Europe in land mass and the number of languages and cultures. It's religiously diverse, and the predominant Hinduism, in which ...

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