CT Women

Q+A: Selling Girls on Craigslist

Rebecca Project founder Malika Saada Saar explains how Craigslist became the medium for human trafficking.

On Saturday night I attended a dinner party in Laguna. A guest seated next to me pulled out a snazzy looking camera, and raved about how he got it for a steal on Craigslist.

In the car, I asked my sister if she's used Craigslist. "Of course! It's the best. It's where all the college students look for housing and jobs." The online classifieds service is one of the most popular websites in the US today.

It's also used for selling women and underage girls.

Last year, Craigslist changed their "erotic services" name to "adult services." They also promised to manually monitor the section for any instances of child prostitution or human trafficking. And they started charging $5 to $10 per sexual service post.

The result? The privately-owned company's revenues for prostitution have gone up. This past April, the FBI arrested 14 Mafia members for selling girls ages 15 to 19 on Craigslist in New York and New Jersesy.

Human rights activists continue to call Craigslist the "biggest online hub for selling ...

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