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Anorexia and the Body of Christ

Harriet Brown's success story using family based treatment for her daughter's eating disorder suggests we 'all' could stand to share meals.

Harriet Brown's new memoir, Brave Girl Eating: A Family's Struggle with Anorexia, challenges popular beliefs about eating disorders. Many psychologists and nutritionists say that getting anorexics to eat won't work until "underlying psychological issues" are dealt with, yet many anorexics die before that can happen. The deadliest of all psychological disorders, anorexia has an abysmal recovery rate: 30 to 40 percent recover completely; 20 percent die; the rest cycle in and out of hospitals and treatment programs.

When Brown's 14-year-old daughter, Kitty, became anorexic, the author voraciously read up on the disorder. Dissatisfied with traditional explanations and terrified by the recovery rates, she encountered a lesser-known option: Family Based Treatment (FBT), or the Maudsley Approach. It sounds simple enough: Phase 1: Restore the patient's weight. Phase 2: Return control over eating to the patient. Phase 3: Resume normal development. It's done at home, with Mom and Dad sitting with ...

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