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How 'Modest Is Hottest' Is Hurting Christian Women


Dec 15 2011
What the phrase communicates about female sexuality and bodies.

In response to this aspect of the Christian tradition, Rosemary Radford Ruether and other feminist theologians have over the past 50 years rightly challenged the mind-body dualism by which women were thought to be "modeled after the rejected part of the psyche," and are "shallow, fickle-minded, irrational, carnal-minded, lacking all the true properties of knowing and willing and doing."

All this negative talk about the female body may have created a vacuum for the "modest is hottest" approach to fill. Perhaps the phrase's originator hoped to provide a more positive spin on modesty. I sympathize with that. However, "modest is hottest" also perpetuates (and complicates) this objectification of women by equating purity with sexual desire. The word "hot" is fraught with sexual undertones. It continues a tradition in which women are primarily objects of desire, but it does so in an acceptable Christian way.

Making modesty sexy is not the solution we need. Instead, the church needs to overhaul its theology of the female body. Women continue to be associated with their bodies in ways that men are not. And, as a result of this unique association, women's identities are also uniquely tied to their bodies in a manner that men's identities are not.

How do we discuss modesty in a manner that celebrates the female body without objectifying women, and still exhorts women to purity? The first solution is to dispense with body-shaming language. Shame is great at behavior modification, even when the shaming is not overt. But shame-based language is not the rhetoric of Jesus. It is the rhetoric of his Enemy.

Second, we must affirm the value of the female body. The value or meaning of a woman's body is not the reason for modesty. Women's bodies are not inherently distracting or tempting. On the contrary, women's bodies glorify God. Dare I say that a woman's breasts, hips, bottom, and lips all proclaim the glory of the Lord! Each womanly part honors Him. He created the female body, and it is good.

Finally, language about modesty should focus not on hiding the female body but on understanding the body's created role. Immodesty is not the improper exposure of the body per se, but the improper orientation of the body. Men and women are urged to pursue a modesty by which our glory is minimized and God's is maximized. The body, the spirit and the mind all have a created role that is inherently God-centered. When we make ourselves central instead of God, we display the height of immodesty.

Related Topics:Modesty; Sex and Sexuality

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How 'Modest Is Hottest' Is Hurting Christian Women