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Christians Launch Anti-Slavery Efforts for Super Bowl XLV

This year's game is located in one of the nation's seedbeds of human trafficking.

Cowboys stadium. Troy Polamalu. Black Eyed Peas. Ben Roethlisberger. Sex trafficking of minors. Christina Aguilera. Doritos' controversy-tinged "Crash the Super Bowl" contest. Those irritating Go Daddy commercials.

Which of these things is not like the others? Believe it or not, they all describe the close-at-hand Super Bowl XLV, where cheese heads and yellow-towel touters will cheer on their respective teams, Dallas hotels and airports will receive an estimated 100,000 visitors, with a projected economic impact of $611.7 million on the area, and pimps and traffickers will set up makeshift brothels in hotels and blocks of houses, selling the bodies of vulnerable children and teens. And while major sporting events are well known as seedbeds of sexual exploitation, this year's game might be worse: Texas senator Leticia Van de Putte recently reported that over 20 percent of all trafficking victims into the U.S. come through Texas. And in 2008, reports the Fort Worth Star Telegram, 38 percent ...

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