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Mourning the Death of Family-Friendly TV

What the loss of "family hour" reveals about our fragmented society—including the church.

It was an opportunity I had dreamed of my entire teenage life. I would stand on a football field, albeit with hundreds of other teenagers, and sing on national television alongside Reba McEntire. Any aspiring singer would jump at the opportunity, especially if she admired Reba like I did.

My dad, however, was not enthusiastic. The event fell on Thanksgiving Day, designated as a special time for our family to enjoy the day together and celebrate traditions. I didn't appreciate the importance of it, especially since it was squashing my chance of getting "discovered." Now that I'm an adult, I understand what my dad was trying to instill in me. He was willing to go against the ambient culture in order to maintain family time.

The Los Angeles Times recently reported on the decline of "the family hour," a traditional set of TV programming made to appeal to the whole family. What was once a coveted and heavily marketed hour is now becoming increasingly mainstream and adult in its broadcasting. ...

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