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Lusting After Asparagus?: Our Culture's Food Porn Problem

What's wrong with ogling beautifully shot images of filet mignon and other rich foods? A lot, actually.

The Old Testament book Song of Songs is pretty racy. And not infrequently, its sexual imagery is expressed through food metaphors:

As an apple tree among the trees of the forest,
so is my beloved among the young men.
With great delight I sat in his shadow,
and his fruit was sweet to my taste
.

Similarly, a Sumerian poem "The song of the lettuce" (lettuce, believe it or not, was considered an aphrodisiac in the Ancient Near East; when lettuces goes to seed, it shoots up tall and, ahem, releases a milky white sap), is all about, well, eating "the honey man":

"… my lord, the honey man of a goddess, his mother's favourite, whose hands are honey, whose feet are honey, will make me sweet, whose limbs are honey-sweet, will make me sweet."

These poets—as well as the writer of Like Water for Chocolate—remind us of the similarities between eating and sex, which are both sites of "bodily interfacing" (a place where a body meets something outside itself) and which are both potentially ...

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