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Katy Perry's Part of Me 3-D: Does Everyone Really Like a Good Girl Gone Bad?

The pop artist's feature-length documentary shows her at her most vulnerable.

Sex, drugs, and rock and roll may have defined rock culture in the 1970s and '80s, but in Katy Perry's feature-length documentary, which released today, it's clear that a younger generation has embraced a more racy, sexually overt identity, one that Perry's music has encapsulated.

In Part of Me 3-D, thousands of Perry's fans turned out to hundreds of tour dates, dressed in colorful wigs and cupcake bras, dancing to a soundtrack created by a pop artist who has been rewarded for emerging from a sheltered, Pentecostal background to belt out lyrics that glorify same-sex hookups, drunkenness, and male anatomy as the pinnacle of ecstasy for this generation.

"She writes her lyrics straight from her diary," manager Bradford Cobb says in the film. "She speaks for her fans - for her generation."

Since Christianity Today last covered the life of Perry, 27, ("Katy Perry: 'I'm Still a Christian'") in 2010, her music career has rocketed to record heights, while her marriage to then-fiancfamp;copy; Russell ...

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