CT Women

Did Karen Klein Do the Right Thing? Bullying and the Limits of 'Turn the Other Cheek'

How I wish the elderly bus monitor would have responded to her young abusers.

Maybe it was the tragic trifecta of bangs, glasses, and braces that marked me a prime target on bus rides to Northmont Middle School in the fall of 1997. It could have been a certain demeanor, a silliness that peaked after eight class periods and liked making girlfriends laugh, usually through outbursts of song. Maybe it was something less obvious, a sensitive spirit that peers, angry and hardened by who knows what, could sniff out. For whatever reason, Tara sniffed out me.

Tara lived on Rankin, a newly developed street three past Herr Street, down which I walked every morning at 7:10 to catch the bus. The mornings were okay, mostly; I'd slide into a military-green seat near the front and look intently out the window, avoiding eyes with Tara and her posse of highschoolers as they boarded. Tara had long brown hair and wore Nike Jordans; she displayed the brashness of the women I had seen on The Real World, which I had sneakily watched in my grandmother's basement the summer prior. A mere ...

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