Opinion | Sexuality

Why 'Slut' Cuts to the Core—of All of Us

The furor over Rush Limbaugh's comments illustrates the power of a single word.

Are you a slut?

Have you ever been one?

Have you ever been made to feel like one?

Have you ever made someone else feel like one?

Have you ever called someone a slut, even if only in your mind?

Chances are that most of us fall into one or more of these categories.

It's funny how some words in our language are considered "swear" words and are regulated by the FCC, and other words aren't technically in this category, yet are viler than some of the banned words. Slut is one of those words. It even sounds ugly: a hiss that slides into a grunt and slams shut, case closed. It cuts deep in both sound and sense.

The word's long history in the English language has so many uses that it's nearly meaningless. Originally the term slut referred to a slovenly person (not necessarily female) and later came to be an acceptable name for a kitchen maid. But it's been used as an insult for a promiscuous woman for centuries. That still doesn't clear things up, however. In Noah Webster's 1828 dictionary, promiscuous ...

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