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I'm Not Julia: Why Obama's American Woman Doesn't Speak for Me

By the government's estimate, women are best when they live life alone. Not so fast.

If you follow political news at all, by now you've probably heard of Julia, the character who made her debut recently on President Obama's campaign website. The "Life of Julia" page documents this fictional woman's life, from her entrance into the Head Start program at age 3, to her retirement and receiving of monthly Social Security benefits at age 67. Launched May 4, the chicly designed slideshow aims to demonstrate "how President Obama's policies help one woman over her lifetime—and how Mitt Romney would change her story." Thus, it's stoked the ongoing national argument over the size, scope, and purpose of government.

But there's more to the story of Julia than that.

A careful look at her life story reveals just how thoroughly alone Julia is. Ross Douthat of The New York Times put his finger on it when he wrote, "… She seems to have no meaningful relationships apart from her bond with the Obama White House: no friends or siblings or extended family, no husband ('Julia decides ...

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