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A New Chapter in the Homeschooling Movement

Homeschooling families will thrive if they work together, not maroon themselves on separate islands.

No home school is an island,
Entire of itself.
Each kitchen table classroom is connected to neighborhood, big "C" Church and culture,
A part of the main.

With apologies to John Donne, this is a story that the homeschooling community hasn't always been good at telling itself.

A generation ago, the first wave of homeschooling parents were doing the work of pioneers: fighting court battles, developing educational philosophy, creating and adapting curricula, and answering endless questions about whether their kids would be socialized properly.

These pioneers continue to shape popular perceptions of the movement: quirky, brainy children who get master's degrees at 16; super-sized, ultra-conservative broods; or crunchy attachment-parenting families. There are flat-out negative stereotypes as well, like that of the barely literate truants parked in front of a flickering TV all day, eating bags of chips and playing video games.

Hard-and-fast numbers of homeschoolers are difficult to come by, since ...

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