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In Defense of Church Hoppers
In Defense of Church Hoppers

In Defense of Church Hoppers


Jan 28 2013
Some Christians' spiritual baggage makes it harder to find a church home

The commitment to meet together may be a mark of spiritual maturity; however, plenty of church-goers maintain their affiliation solely for family or social reasons. Those still on the search for a church often have a backstory, whether a conflict at a former congregation, a moral misstep they are trying to hide or any number of reasons.

My husband and I have been through periods of church hopping during our 33-year marriage. It would have been more pleasant to skip the Sunday morning visitor routine and go out for brunch or take a hike, but our desire for community and meaningful corporate worship trumped our newbie fatigue every time.

I currently have several friends who might be characterized as church hoppers. These wanderers do long to stay put, but face steep challenges when it comes to finding a church home. Consider:

  • A congregational lay leader has become burnt out after years of church politics at his former church. Every new church he visits triggers grief and suspicion; some after just one visit, others after he sojourns there for a few months. He isn't giving up, as he knows that the healing will happen in the context of healthy community.
  • After a relocation to a family-centered far-flung suburb, a pair of childless 20-somethings can't seem to get past being the "new people" in the two churches they've tried for about six months each. They've chalked their outsider status up to the fact that they don't have children, which seem to be the key to cracking into these congregations' social circles.
  • A single mom of a teen with special needs can't find a church hospitable to both her divorced status and her son's physical and emotional challenges. It would be much simpler if she gave up her church search, but she continues to visit churches when she can because she is longing for spiritual support.

Despite a negative experience with a toxic church, despite loneliness, despite facing a lack of hospitality or ministry resources, each of these friends continues their hop with the hope of finding a church home.

They have not "given up on meeting together." Their persistent and prolonged church searches fully capture the spirit of those words penned to the dispersed Hebrew believers in the first century.

Martin Luther said, "Anyone who is to find Christ must first find the church. How could anyone know where Christ is and what faith is in him unless he knew where his believers are?" Sometimes it takes a marathon of church hopping to find them.

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