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Jodie Foster's Confession (No, Not That One) Made Her My Hero Paul Drinkwater / NBC / AP
Jodie Foster's Confession (No, Not That One) Made Her My Hero

Jodie Foster's Confession (No, Not That One) Made Her My Hero


Jan 17 2013
Relating to a frank and fragile voice of loneliness

We may fear that others will see our confession of loneliness as a sign of social or spiritual failure. What if our loneliness scares others away from us? Worse yet, what if well-meaning church members try to fix us? These attempts at repair may imprint a lonely person with one of two labels: "project" or "pariah."

The truth is, lonely people can be an uncomfortable reflection of our own unprocessed fears of isolation or abandonment. In God's kingdom, there is no separate neighborhood for projects or pariahs. Lonely people—each one of us—have equal status as welcomed, wanted members of his community.

This community offers a stark contrast to the kind of no-commitment water cooler camaraderie for which we settle in our culture. In her speech, Foster noted our Honey Boo Boo-like tendencies toward exhibitionistic and voyeuristic behavior. We are far more comfortable with filmed "confessions" of outrageous behavior from Real Housewives, bearded Duck Dynasty magnates or stilettoed Kardashians than we are with an honest expression of loneliness.

The rumor of an impending confession from disgraced cyclist Lance Armstrong is the kind of non-Foster-like confession that will likely follow the pattern of other celebrities who come clean about their grimy behavior only when they are cornered and facing financial loss and/or litigation. These kinds of confessions often seem to add another layer of camouflage to a celebrity's persona. It's as though they simply add a new mask to the disguise he or she has been wearing all along.

Jodie Foster, an actress who has spent 47 years behind a performer's façade, fumbled a bit as she tugged at the strings of her mask during her Golden Globes speech. But the mask came off in the final moments of her speech as she moved beyond confessing her choices to voicing her loneliness.

She may not have thought of her words on Sunday night as a prayer. I did. And I echo them today for each one of us who longs not to be so very lonely for to the One who knows us, cherishes us, and promises he will never, never leave us alone.

Related Topics:Confession; Fame; Loneliness

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Jodie Foster's Confession (No, Not That One) Made Her My Hero