CT Women

The Blurred Lines of Cultural Consumption

Transformation, redemption, and a certain raunchy Robin Thicke video.
The Blurred Lines of Cultural Consumption
Robin Thicke / Star Track Recordings / Vevo

When I played the music video for the song of the summer, "Blurred Lines," topless women sashayed across my screen to the delight of Robin Thicke, Pharrell Williams and T.I., and my heart sank.

It was my fault. I should've noticed the "unrated version" warning in parentheses before I clicked on the link, but when my friend told me about her new summer jam, I hurried to check it out.

It sank even further when I watched on the "rated" version, which somehow managed to be even more offensive—"degrading" according to Thicke himself. No longer caught up in the boobs on my screen, I noticed the performers' leering, creepy eyes that couldn't unglue themselves from the female dancers' (covered) butts.

My heart sank because I recognized the song. Without knowing the name or artist, I'd already gotten hooked on Thicke's "Blurred Lines," with its infectious melody and dance-a-licious groove. My kids and I had ...

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