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Bless These Hands That Instagram My Food

Michael Pollan and today's foodie culture make home cooking hip.
Bless These Hands That Instagram My Food
Joe Valtierra / Flickr

Lord, bless this food, and bless the hands that prepared it…

As far back as I can remember, whenever I heard this particular cliché in a mealtime prayer, I'd involuntarily picture a pair of magically disembodied hands, white and fluffy like Mickey and Minnie's gloves, hovering over the kitchen counter, chopping carrots, lifting pot covers, and sweeping minced onions into pans of sizzling oil. "Why are we blessing the hands?" I'd think. "Why not the rest of the person?" It seemed a strange way to bless someone, especially at church dinners, where we all knew the women whose hands had prepared the food, and who, quite often, did the serving and cleaning up as well. Even so, this blessing did evoke the hidden nature of so much domestic work. It still does

Emily Matchar recently took author Michael Pollan to task for blaming women for the decline of home cooking. She notes that in his popular book The Omnivore's Dilemma, Pollan insists ...

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