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Grace for the Not-Quite-Happy Homemaker
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Grace for the Not-Quite-Happy Homemaker


Jun 5 2013
Gloria Furman’s call to find joy at home, through the gospel.

For many wives and mothers, the to-do lists never end. Their days get fuller and busier, but deep in their hearts, they still somehow feel bored and ordinary. They're doing enough things to leave them exhausted each night, but are they doing big enough things for Jesus?

It happens to 21st-century working women and stay-at-home moms in the suburbs. Any woman who finds her work mundane and ordinary could be tempted toward discouragement. But Gloria Furman is here to say—gracefully and with so much heart—"Not so fast, ladies."

In her new book, Glimpses of Grace: Treasuring the Gospel in Your Home, she encourages women to see that the endless quest for bigger and better things is not necessarily what the Christian life is all about. Thankfully, she doesn't add anything else to our to-do lists, instead, she offers a new perspective on our everyday lives:

Glimpses of Grace is about the "already, but not yet" time in God's redemptive history. Jesus is alive—he is not in the grave…I used to believe that this journey of sanctification—the adventure of God working in me, both to will and to work for his good pleasure (Phil. 2:13)—would only be accomplished when I am free from the "distractions' of my life."

The reality is that while our lives are hardly distraction-free, God is always working to make us more like him and show us more of himself—even in the seemingly mundane. I spoke with her about her new book and how we can treasure Christ even when our life seems far too ordinary.

You have written this book encouraging women to treasure Christ in the midst of homemaking. Women have been working in the home for decades, why do you think now is the time for this book?

One of my prayers for this book is that it would encourage any woman as she considers the life she lives inside her home regardless of her context. Some of my neighbors [in Dubai] live with their parents until they are married, and then they live with their new husband's parents. Some women simultaneously manage homes and jobs in the workplace. Women's lives in the home are different in seasons and in different cultures.

I felt that the only way that I could write about treasuring Christ in the midst of homemaking was if I took pains to keep the focus concentrated on the person and work of Jesus Christ, and not a how-to manual with ten ways to clean your kitchen floor (though if anyone has some tips for my kitchen floor, I'm currently trying to figure out why the mopping solution is making the floor sticky). In short, I think now is a great time to consider how treasuring Christ in the context of your home is for God's glory and our joy in him.

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