Opinion | Sexuality

Sorority Syndrome: Girls Gone Mean

If we're not careful, big groups breed shallow friendships.
Sorority Syndrome: Girls Gone Mean
Image: Murray State / Flickr

People are surprised when I admit that I belonged in a sorority in college. I wore the T-shirts, sang the songs, learned the handshake, went to the parties… the whole thing. Sororities have such a negative stereotype that it's hard for some to imagine a nice, smart, normal person joining a sorority.

The very worst of such stereotypes were laid out in a profanity-filled, CAPS LOCK-ENGAGED sorority e-mail-gone-viral last month. This tirade from a member to her "f—ing awkward" and anti-social chapter became fodder for Gawker, Buzzfeed, Funny or Die, and the rest of the easily amused Internet. (Fair warning: Those links contain lots of offensive language.) The context of the e-mail isn't the real draw—the social standing of Delta Gamma at the University of Maryland doesn't quite merit national concern and the sender has since resigned. Instead, it's her tone that catches our attention. Catty. Demanding. Mean.

Most of us probably haven't ...

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