Opinion | Sexuality

A Time to Die

Americans have forgotten the art of dying.
A Time to Die
Image: Chris Marchant / Flickr

There was a time when I hoped—and even prayed—that my friend's death would come very soon.

That's a statement easily misconstrued, the kind that validates the cliché that "context is everything," which itself affirms the ancient wisdom of Ecclesiastes. "For everything there is a season," including "a time to be born, and a time to die," "a time to heal," and, if I may presume to expand on the preacher's line of thought, a time to refrain from attempts to heal.

I love that part of the Bible, commonly known as the "wisdom literature," for its keen awareness that what would be hateful in one situation may well be loving in another. I hoped that my friend would die soon because he was old and "full of years"—to use another beautiful biblical phrase—and his suffering had become very great. I would miss him sorely, as I still do, but I prayed that God would grant him what people used ...

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