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The Real Housewives of Duck Dynasty A&E

The Real Housewives of Duck Dynasty


Sep 5 2013
Behind every strong redneck duck-hunter is a strong Christian woman.

Korie's daughter, Sadie, also has a prominent role on the show. We watch Sadie navigate adolescent milestones such as learning to drive or attending a school dance, all with the "help" of a protective father and quirky family members. It's also clear that Sadie has inherited her parents' entrepreneurial spirit and passion for ministry, as she has recently debuted a weekly video devotional and hopes to produce a modest clothing line.

Missy Robertson is married to Jase, another one of Phil and Kay's sons. Missy is very involved in the family and seems to have a playful relationship with her husband. Although the show portrays her as being somewhat high-strung, Missy seems to be a hard worker, a diligent wife and mother, and a woman of faith.

Jessica Robertson, is married to Jep, Phil and Kay's youngest son, and they have four children together. Jessica rarely appeared in the first season but she emerged as a more frequent character in the second and third. We know the least about Jessica, but she seems to have a sweet disposition and is a friend to her fellow Robertson sisters-in-law.

Although Duck Dynasty sometimes defaults to gender stereotypes—i.e. the "citified" daughters-in-law who hate to hunt, or the slacker husbands who want to squander the day fishing and not showering—the characters are both loving and deep. The women of Duck Dynasty are not wallflowers, subservient doormats, or flat types. Each woman on the show has contours, has a voice, and serves as an important partner to her husband.

That's what I love most about Duck Dynasty. Of all the shows on television right now, Duck Dynasty is one of the few that does not objectify women, but portrays them as whole persons. Furthermore, it pushes back against shallow stereotypes of Christian womanhood. The Robertson women are not cookie cutter look-alikes. They're not all stay-at-home moms, or incredible cooks, or silent submissives. Korie is a businesswoman without a knack for cooking or sewing, and Miss Kay wields a gentle yet authoritative power in the family. As the two main female characters, Korie and Miss Kay are not cut from the same cloth, but each woman has her own strengths, her own areas of influence, and her own expressions of self. And amidst this diversity, each embodies the biblical image of a woman "clothed in strength and dignity" (Prov. 31:25).

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