Jump directly to the content
Toxic Leaders in Our RanksMCCS KEVIN ELLIOTT / The National Guard / Flickr

Toxic Leaders in Our Ranks


Feb 5 2014
New Army research could inform how the church fosters healthier, godlier leadership.

Ten years ago, the United States Army decided to explore a previously forbidden subject: toxic leadership. What they learned could have far-reaching ramifications for their organization, but also for others, including the church.

It all started when then Brigadier General Pete Bayer sought to understand why nearly 30 soldiers stationed in Iraq committed or attempted suicide in 2009. After extensive interviews, researchers found that in each case, the victims served under a leader who classified as toxic. According to the Army's manual, toxic leadership includes:

A combination of self-centered attitudes, motivations, and behaviors that have adverse effects on subordinates, the organization, and mission performance. This leader lacks concern for others and the climate of the organization, which leads to short- and long-term negative effects.

The toxic leader operates with an inflated sense of self-worth and from acute self-interest.... Prolonged use of negative leadership to influence followers undermines the followers' will, initiative, and potential, and destroys unit morale.

This description contradicts the leadership modeled by Jesus and his disciples, which values servanthood, sacrifice, love, and concern for the followers' future. While most religious leaders embody these godly qualities, more than a few of us have encountered ecclesiastical leaders who, according to the Army's description, would be classified as toxic.

Obviously, the consequences of toxic leadership within the military are generally more costly than within the church; the worst church will never equate with the horrors of combat (sexual abuse by priests and pastors not withstanding). Furthermore, though Scripture commands us to be continually transformed into the image of Christ, not one of us will achieve perfection. As such, our expectations of what a leader should be need to adjust accordingly. That said, the Army's willingness to admit that they have a leadership issue that needs to be addressed can embolden those of us in the church to learn how to recognize broken leaders in our own ranks. Our awareness might limit their influence before too much damage is done.

A common characteristic of toxic leaders is their tendency to hoard power and shun accountability. Sir John Dalberg-Acton famously wrote, "Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power absolutely corrupts." If a toxic leader is part of an organization that idolizes and rewards those who wield power, such as the military, they may quickly rise through the ranks, growing increasingly disinterested in partnering with anyone but those they deem equal status.

Related Topics:Church; Military

To add a comment you need to be a registered user or Christianity Today subscriber.

orSubscribeor
More from Her.menutics
From Midriffs to Social Media: Parenting Teen Girls in the 21st Century

From Midriffs to Social Media: Parenting Teen Girls in the 21st Century

Don’t let the topic fool you. ‘Enough’ is full of substance and wisdom.
Christine Caine, Liberty University to Launch ‘Lean In’-Type Program for Christian Women

Christine Caine, Liberty University to Launch ‘Lean In’-Type Program for Christian Women

Propel calls on the church to equip and validate working women.
Careful What You Click For

Careful What You Click For

A call to steward our page views well.
To Have and to Hold, In Hardship and Unhappiness

To Have and to Hold, In Hardship and Unhappiness

Having faith in marriage, for the long haul.
Include results from Christianity Today
Browse Archives:

So Hot Right Now

Bringing Booty Back

Finding the right reasons for self-acceptance amid a body-positive music boom.

What We're Reading

CT eBooks and Bible Studies

Christianity Today
Toxic Leaders in Our Ranks