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James Cowles

January 08, 2014  6:28pm

@ Carlos Ramirez Trevino ... "But what causes that dispersal, transformation, or transfer of heat from the water to the ice?" What transfers the heat and evens out the temperature is the motion of the molecules of water (liquid and ice) when they bang into each other, like billiard balls. At first, the molecules of liquid water have a much higher mean velocity than the molecules of the ice. The molecules of liquid bang into the molecules of the ice, imparting motion to the ice molecules, which gradually break apart as the ice liquefies. The ice molecules absorb the impact and slow down the liquid molecules, cooling the liquid. The liquid thus heats up the ice as the ice cools down the liquid. Again, think of billiard balls banging into each other. It's all a matter of the transfer of kinetic energy among the molecules. Same thing is happening on the scale of the entire universe. Hence the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics, which anti-evolution people routinely misunderstand BTW.

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Carlos Ramirez Trevino

January 08, 2014  11:46am

This is all too interesting! You also have a very effective way of explaining it. But what causes that dispersal, transformation, or transfer of heat from the water to the ice? For example, we put ice in a glass of warm water to cool it down. Isn't the ice transferring its coolness to the warm water, as opposed to the water its warmth to the cold ice? Or is that where the leveling comes in, they both disperse their heat to meet at a median, where the cold becomes warmer and the warm colder? This is, of course, all very objective and constant. I watched an episode of Criminal Minds and one investigator solves a puzzle. When asked what it means, he simply says something like, "I don't know what it means. I can tell you what it is, but I can't tell you what it means". What is it that makes us appreciate these things? How is it that we can even understand it? I guess my question is what is mind and how does it relate to the universe?

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James Cowles

January 07, 2014  6:10pm

@ Carlos Ramirez Trevino ... " ... is there too much emphasis on the role of gravity on this phenomena? Can gravity alone explain why the moon circles the earth or the earth the sun?" For LARGE masses and LARGE distances, there is no such thing as "too much emphasis on ... gravity". For LARGE masses and LARGE distances -- large enough to be of astronomical significance -- gravity basically "rules the roost". Gravity keeps stars burning their nuclear fuel by providing the force that compresses hydrogen. Gravity determines the orbits of planets and moons around their primary bodies (stars, planets). There are 4 forces in nature: strong, weak, electromagnetic, and gravity. The first 3 are, by far, MUCH stronger than gravity, but their effects decrease much more rapidly with distance and are not tied to the mass of an object. Gravity is weaker, but is closely related to mass and falls of much more slowly with distance. So gravity dominates on the cosmic scale.

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James Cowles

January 07, 2014  6:05pm

@ Carlos Ramirez Trevino ... "Is Entropy sort of a leveling of heat in a particular environment (universe), where heat in objects acts like water that when poured tends to disperse to find its level? Likewise, heat will transfer from a hotter object to one that is cooler, in sort of an attempt to seek equilibrium? If so, I can begin to understand how this exchange or transfer of heat can be at its maximum capacity continually. The condition of a universe can then be in a constant state of molecular transition." Yes ... that's a pretty good colloquial description of entropy. Entropy is DISorder in a system. Boil some water in a cup. Now drop in a couple of ice cubes. That cup-and-ice system is ordered: the ice is HERE and the hot water is THERE. As time goes by, the ice melts and is distributed evenly throughout the cup. So there is DISorder: everything is mixed together ... the cold water that was in the ice and the hot water (now much cooler) that was in the cup.

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Carlos Ramirez Trevino

January 07, 2014  5:58am

One more thing. I don't know much about the formation of stars and planetary orbits, but is there too much emphasis on the role of gravity on this phenomena? Can gravity alone explain why the moon circles the earth or the earth the sun? The Bible says that God placed the planets in their orbits. How He did that is another matter. Mechanically speaking however, once gravity pulls, it continues to pull. So, is there something other than gravity that can account for the concentration of the "soup" into a solid? Is there perhaps another, yet undiscovered law of physics that can account for the concentration of dispersed particles into a solid?

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