Opinion | Family
Never on Pause
In seasons of unpaid work or at-home care, your calling is still significant.
My area of Washington, DC, often doesn't fit the picture of a secularizing America. Nana Dolce (MTS, Palmer Theological Seminary) lives in Washington, DC, with her family.
Opinion | Discipleship
Are Smart, Educated Women Still Called to the Church Nursery?
For women like me, children’s ministry can seem like low-level work for the least experienced.
Angela Jasper, 67, has taught Sunday school to children in her southeast Washington, DC, church for the past 38 years and prays that each student would grow in the knowledge and
interview | Discipleship
How a Disney Ballerina Ended Up Fighting Modern Slavery
A director of church mobilization for International Justice Mission says women can’t have it all, but they can have something better.
Peter and I attended IJM's benefit dinner in Washington, DC. I bring him home a flag from every country I visit, and he asks me to say “hi” to the president when I go to Washington, DC.
Opinion | Church
6 Things Your Church Can Do During the Refugee Ban
The recent executive order has thrust refugees and resettlement agencies into limbo. Here’s how you can help.
an airplane for Jordan in early January to deliver medicines from MAP International to Syrian and Iraqi refugees, my church, National Presbyterian in Washington, DC, was making final
Opinion | Pop Culture
Why We Need Wonder Woman
Even when it falters, the new female-led film brings freshness to the superhero flick.
She works as an editor at The Hill newspaper in Washington, DC, and also writes for The Washington Post, The Atlantic, Quartz, 5280 Magazine and Thrillist.
Women’s March Sets Out to Exclude 40 Percent of American Women
What pro-life feminists actually have in common with their pro-choice counterparts.
Ahead of the Women's March on Washington scheduled the day after Donald Trump's inauguration, Emma Green at The Atlantic asked, “Is there room in the movement for people who
Reporting | Discipleship
Cohousing: The New American Family
How alternative forms of living are changing communities, challenging the church, and keeping millennials in the fold.
David Brooks recently wrote about a Washington, DC, couple who invited their son's friend over for dinner. This small act snowballed into a weekly dinner
Reporting | Church
It Doesn't Pay to Go on Maternity Leave at Most Evangelical Seminaries
On Christian campuses, unofficial flexibility is more common than extra benefits for new parents.
Such laws—currently enacted in four states and Washington, DC—require employers to cover a portion of wages while a new mom or dad stays home with his or her new child.
After Childhood Abuse, How Can I Trust Others with My Kids?
I equip my daughters to protect themselves and their bodies in ways I didn’t learn to.
Knowing this, what do I do with the notion that “it takes a church to raise a child?” My family belongs to a large church in southeast Washington, DC. The
I'm a Conservative Married to a Liberal
The gospel gives us guidelines for how to navigate our differences.
I graduated from Hillsdale College, a bastion of conservatism, and served for almost 10 years in Washington, DC, as the press secretary for one of the most conservative members of
Opinion | Discipleship
Freed from the Life I've Always Wanted
How Jesus confronted my "good Christian life"
Across my teenage years and into the start of adulthood and marriage, through a big-city stint in Washington, DC, even after the purchase of our first home on a small-town corner lot
Opinion | Family
Why Christians Need to Embrace a Changing Definition of FamilySubscriber access only
Single friends: We “traditional” families need you.
It's a saying commonly heard in Washington, DC, a place with changing political administrations, students and interns who come and go, and a workforce of upwardly mobile
Married Sex Is Good for You
Things we're reading and discussing this week.
Here, Sales (one of 50 leaders spotlighted in the new Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC) speaks of the crisis of white, rural
interview | Discipleship
Why Abortion Workers Need Our Forgiveness and Support
Some pro-life advocates view Planned Parenthood employees as killers complicit in crimes. Abby Johnson sees them as people worth rescuing.
0; tweet; link; email; print. This last Saturday, half a million women participated in the Women's March on Washington. I'm speaking at the March for Life in DC.
How Mother Teresa Changed Missions
Every outreach-oriented believer should know the secret of the 'Saint of Calcutta.'
funded by the Templeton Religion Trust. Born and raised in Bangalore, India, she lives in Washington DC with her husband Tim and their five children.
Opinion | Family
Public Displays of Christian Affection
Why we shouldn’t be turned off by healthy touch.
Lore Ferguson Wilbert is a writer and thinker based in Washington, DC. You can read more of her work onhttp:// sayable.net and follow her on twitter at @lorewilbert.
Opinion | Sexuality
Working Moms, On Screen and Behind the CameraSubscriber access only
Documentarian Laura Waters Hinson creates films to reflect the ultimate narrative.
wife, mother, and worship leader. Her award-winning films span subjects from street vendors in Washington DC to female entrepreneurship in Rwanda.
Opinion | Pop Culture
Don’t Underestimate Single Women Voters
How unmarried women stand to change party politics on both sides of the aisle.
Anika Smith is an associate editor at The Stream and a musician who moved from Seattle to Washington DC years ago but has yet to recover from the shock.
Opinion | Pop Culture
To the Confused, Apathetic, and Undecided Christian Voters
Our political engagement matters to our country, our neighbors, and God.
She is a co-author of Unleashing Opportunity: Why Escaping Poverty Requires a Shared Vision of Justice. A New Jersey native, Thompson now lives in Washington DC. [Image source].
Opinion | Family
Confessions of a (Sinful) Overachiever
Praise or mockery: The problem with our reactions to “super-moms.”
Nana Dolce was born in Ghana, but lives today in Washington DC with her husband Eric and two daughters. She is a first-year homeschooling mother