The commercialization of Christmas even in distant Japan, where special brilliance and impressive displays may be found in Tokyo’s great department stores, is a reflection of the paganized Christmas of the Western world.

There is no reason to marvel that unregenerate men should miss the meaning of Christmas. For many it is just one more occasion for revelry, which is regrettable but understandable. Why? Is it not a holiday? And is the air not filled with a spirit of festivity?

Are not Santa Claus, sleighs, and reindeer symbols of Christmas? Why should not the liquor stores be decorated in honor of the occasion?

If Christmas is a symbol of fleshly desire and satisfaction, its slogan might aptly be: “Let us eat and drink and be merry, for tomorrow we die”—but let’s leave off the last phrase to enhance the meaning of the first.

To pagans—cultured, educated, financially secure American pagans—Christmas is a mad swirl of diversions and pleasures; but what about those of us who are Christians? Has the true significance of the day when God came to earth in human flesh been borne into our own souls? Is the reality of his incarnation something which thrills us even as the magnitude of its implication baffles human understanding?

In eternity God, our loving Heavenly Father, viewing the past, the present and the future, as one unending panorama, saw the yet uncreated universe; and with an infinity of wisdom no man can possibly understand, he made his plan for the redemption of sin-sick humanity, and at the center of this plan was his own beloved Son.

Sharing in the glory of the Father, participating in the counsels of eternity, endowed with the authority and power to bring all things into being, Christ saw this panorama of history and his ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Have something to add about this? See something we missed? Share your feedback here.

Our digital archives are a work in progress. Let us know if corrections need to be made.

Tags:
Issue: