Marx: Weighed And Found Wanting
Communism and Christian Faith, by Lester De Koster (Eerdmans, 1962, 158 pp., $3.50), is reviewed by C. Gregg Singer, Professor of History, Catawba College, Salisbury, North Carolina.

The continuing crisis involving not only the United States and Russia, but the whole world, has brought a seemingly endless flood of literature dealing with the problem of communism. Too much of this material fails to present the basic issues of the conflict in which the West is engaged, and falls far short of the goal in its effort to present an adequate defense of the Western concept of freedom and life. Not a little of this literature actually relies upon some of the presuppositions of the very liberalism out of which Marxism arose, in its efforts to give a satisfactory answer to the challenge of communism. This reviewer believes that it were far better that some of these books were never written for they weaken rather than strengthen the case of the West.

It is, therefore, a privilege and a pleasure to turn to the work of Professor De Koster. He writes with a penetrating insight into the very nature of the communist movement. He evaluates it in the light of its internal deficiencies, and yet treats the movement with an historical accuracy which is all too often lacking in much of the propaganda let loose against communism in an uninformed and sometimes irresponsible manner. He travels far beyond the hackneyed criticisms of Marx to those that are not so well recognized. Particularly valuable are his insights into the detachment which the communist philosophy and practice must bring between the worker and property. De Koster hurls back at Marx the very charge which Marx had leveled against the capitalism of his ...

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