As is always true, numerous books were published relating to New Testament studies during the past year. Nothing that has the appearance of being epoch making materialized, but a large number of substantial works were produced. Excellent studies of individual topics, with a stress on history and background, appeared. That the importance of the context within which the New Testament was written is receiving attention is a point to be noted. Commentaries also received attention, many of them new, and related to the Greek text. Far more numerous are reprints of older works—another point worthy of note. In all, it has been a good year for students of New Testament life and thought.

Significant Books

Five books were selected as “significant books for evangelicals.” They are significant not because they were necessarily written by or for evangelicals (although some were), but because evangelicals ought to read them for their own benefit—sometimes agreeing, sometimes disagreeing.

The Illustrated Bible Dictionary (Tyndale), under organizing editor J. D. Douglas and revision editor Norman Hillyer, is a magnificent three-volume work that will surely find a home in every evangelical’s library. The text is clearly written, up to date, cognizant of critical theories, yet true to the Bible as God’s Word and replete with helpful information. The color illustrations, maps, charts, graphs, and tables enhance the usefulness of the work immensely. This work is destined to become a standard that will be turned to often by students and ministers alike.

Jesus in Gethsemane (Paulist), by David M. Stanley, S.J., is an interesting and moving work combining immense scholarship and Christian piety. It is an intensive study of the early church’s reflections ...

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