UPDATE

Swaggart Responds

Television evangelist Jimmy Swaggart has responded to a CHRISTIANITY TODAY survey of the 15 most-watched television ministries. Results of the survey were published in the October 16 issue of CHRISTIANITY TODAYs (dd. 46–49).

Jimmy Swaggart Ministries produces daily and weekly television programs. The weekly show, according to the Arbitron Ratings Company, is the most popular religious television program, reaching 1,759,000 households.

The ministry lists Swaggart’s salary at $86,000. He receives no bonuses or royalties, nor does the ministry provide him with a vehicle. Swaggart’s compensation package is determined by a nine-member board of directors. Members of Swaggart’s family, who make up less than half the board, cannot vote on the compensation package.

The ministry employs about 1,500 people, claims a net worth of $150 million, and lists its 1986 income at $141.6 million. The survey response stated that 8.7 percent of the ministry’s income is spent on fund raising. The organization is audited annually by independent certified public accountants. And a full, audited financial statement is provided to donors who request one.

NCC

A New Leader

Patricia Ann McClurg has become the first clergywoman to head the National Council of Churches (NCC). A non-ordained woman, Cynthia Wedel, of the Episcopal Church, served in the top NCC post from 1969 to 1972.

McClurg, 48, is associate executive for missions of the presbytery of Elizabeth, New Jersey. She is an ordained minister of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

Elected last month to a two-year term, McClurg succeeds Bishop Philip Cousin of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. McClurg said her goals for the NCC include extending its ...

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