Although Christian colleges are employing more women professors than ever before, new research shows that some of them believe they are being treated unfairly.

The faculty of schools from the Coalition of Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) had a ratio of 70 percent male to 30 percent female on average in 1995, according to researcher Marti Garlett of Claremont University (Calif.). American full-time faculty as a whole are 65 percent male and 35 percent female.

However, Garlett's research shows that relatively few women faculty at Christian colleges attain the higher ranks of associate or full professor. At CCCU schools in 1995, women who were full or associate professors made up only 14 percent of all faculty. By contrast, 49 percent of all faculty in 1995 were male associate or full professors at CCCU schools.

WAITING IN THE WINGS: In Garlett's doctoral dissertation, "Waiting in the Wings: Women of God in the Evangelical Academy," two dozen female academics from CCCU schools spoke anonymously about the difficulties they faced. Garlett's research showed that Christian female professors at times face unfriendly attitudes from male colleagues and students.

One woman academic Garlett interviewed had previously taught for nine years at two different secular institutions. In comparing her teaching experiences, the interviewee reported, "It's been far less comfortable for me as a woman here than anyplace else I've ever taught. I'm the unhappiest in a job that I've ever been."

Other interviewees reported problems with male students. One interviewee revealed, "Male students would present themselves in class and inform me that they had a problem with a woman being in authority over them."

Mary Stewart Van Leeuwen, a professor of ...

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