Classic & Contemporary Excerpts from April 26, 1999

1999This article is part of CT's digital archives. Subscribers have access to all current and past issues, dating back to 1956.

We Look for Better Things

Remember—Christianity proposes not to extinguish our natural desires. It promises to bring the desires under just control and direct them to their true object. In the case of both riches and of honor, it maintains the consistency of its character. But Christianity commands us not to set our hearts on earthly treasures. It reminds us that "we have in heaven a better and more enduring substance" than this world can bestow (Heb. 10:34).

Learning to Pray

Prayer is a form of communication between God and man and man and God. It is of the essence of communication between persons that they should talk with each other from the same basic agenda. Wherever this is not done, communication tends to break down. If, however, an atmosphere of trust can be maintained, then one learns how to wait and be still. It is instructive to examine the prayer life of the Master from this point of view. I am always impressed by the fact that it is recorded that the only thing that the disciples asked Jesus to teach them how to do was to pray.

Mirror Needed

The human race is inquisitive about other people's lives, but negligent to correct their own.

Uneasy Partner

Non-Christians will insist that we should keep our religion out of the way of their politics. But the reason for that is not that Jesus has nothing to do with the public realm; it is that they want nothing to do with Jesus as Lord.

Whose Worship?

The reform that the church needs most is for each worshiper to approach the service (of whatever style) with the proper mindset: worship. No one should enter with the attitude, "Amuse me, since if you're not up to snuff, I'm not coming back." … When we design a service to worship the Lord, the most important, and the ...

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