This summer, George Tiller's late-term abortion facility in Wichita, Kansas, will have a new neighbor—and some business competition.

In an attempt to push the pro-life movement "beyond pro test to provision," the nonprofit Choices Medical Clinic will provide crisis pregnancy counseling, adoption information, and prenatal care—all at no charge. Clinic organizers hope the building's prime location on land purchased in 1993 by a pro-life group, next to Tiller's nationally known business, will attract women who may be having second thoughts about terminating pregnancies.

The clinic is scheduled to open June 7, but the office already has been receiving about eight calls each day, according to executive director Tim Wiesner. "We're filling a niche that hasn't been filled before," he says.

Wiesner, a former medical education manager at a local hospital, joined the clinic after watching a video of a live abortion.

In addition to one paid nurse, Choices Medical Clinic has recruited a volunteer staff of physicians, nurses, social workers, and counselors. Local churches are helping underwrite the anticipated $200,000 per year operating costs. The nonprofit is also seeking donations through ads in national publications.

Despite more than six weeks of protests at his abortion facility by Operation Rescue in 1991 and a shooting attempt on his life in 1993, Tiller's business continues to thrive (CT, Oct. 27, 1997, p. 99). As one of just a few third-trimester abortionists in the country, Tiller attracts a na tional clientele.

Wiesner sees ministry potential in providing a choice for the women heading to Tiller: an option based on compassion, not profit.

"Our purpose is to save babies, but our goal is to save souls," says Wiesner. The ...

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